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By Authority Of 

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

Legally Binding Document 



By the Authority Vested By Part 5 of the United States Code § 552(a) and 
Part 1 of the Code of Regulations § 51 the attached document has been duly 
INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE and shall be considered legally 
binding upon all citizens and residents of the United States of America. 
HEED THIS NOTICE : Criminal penalties may apply for noncompliance. 




Document Name: ICEA S-87-640: Standard for Optical Fiber Outside Plant 

Communications Cable 



CFR Section(s) : 7 CFR 90l ^ 



Standards Body: Insulated Cable Engineers Association 



ANSI/ICEA S-67-640-2006 



I 




STANDARD FOR 



OPTICAL FIBER 



OUTSIDE PLANT COMMUNICATIONS CABLE 



Approved by 

AMERICAN NATIONAL STANDARDS INSTITUTE 

December 8, 2006 

Publication # ANSI/ICEA S-87-640-2006 

Fourth Edition 



© 2006 by ICEA 

INSULATED CABLE ENGINEERS ASSOCIATION, Inc. 



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ANSI/ICEA S-87-640-2006 



STANDARD FOR 

OPTICAL FIBER 

OUTSIDE PLANT COMMUNICATIONS CABLE 

Publication S-87-640 
Fourth Edition - September 2006 



Published By 

Insulated Cable Engineers Association, Inc. (ICEA) 

P.O. Box 1568 

Carrollton, Georgia 30112, USA 



Approved September 13, 2006, by 

INSULATED CABLE ENGINEERS ASSOCIATION, Inc. 

ANSI version: Approved December 8, 2006, by ANSI ASC C-8 
AMERICAN NATIONAL STANDARDS INSTITUTE 



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Contents may not be reproduced 

in any form without permission of the 

INSULATED CABLE ENGINEERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 



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IHS 

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NOTICE AND DISCLAIMER 

The information in this publication was considered technically sound by the consensus 
of persons engaged in the development and approval of the document at the time it was 
developed. Consensus does not necessarily mean that there is unanimous agreement 
among every person participating in the development of this document. 

The Insulated Cable Engineers Association, Inc. (ICEA) standards and guideline 
publications, of which the document contained herein is one, are developed through a 
voluntary consensus standards development process. This process brings together 
persons who have an interest in the topic covered by this publication. While ICEA 
administers the process and establishes rules to promote fairness in the development of 
consensus, it does not independently test, evaluate, or verify the accuracy or 
completeness of any information or the soundness of any judgments contained in its 
standards and guideline publications. 

ICEA disclaims liability for personal injury, property, or other damages of any nature 
whatsoever, whether special, indirect, consequential, or compensatory, directly or 
indirectly resulting from the publication, use of, application, or reliance on this 
document. ICEA disclaims and makes no guaranty or warranty, expressed or implied, 
as to the accuracy or completeness of any information published herein, and disclaims 
and makes no warranty that the information in this document will fulfill any of your 
particular purposes or needs. ICEA does not undertake to guarantee the performance 
of any individual manufacturer or seller's products or services by virtue of this standard 
or guide. 

In publishing and making this document available, ICEA is not undertaking to render 
professional or other services for or on behalf of any person or entity, nor is ICEA 
undertaking to perform any duty owed by any person or entity to someone else. 
Anyone using this document should rely on his or her own independent judgment or, as 
appropriate, seek the advice of a competent professional in determining the exercise of 
reasonable care in any given circumstances. Information and other standards on the 
topic covered by this publication may be available from other sources, which the user 
may wish to consult for additional views or information not covered by this publication. 

ICEA has no power, nor does it undertake to police or enforce compliance with the 
contents of this document. ICEA does not certify, test, or inspect products, designs, or 
installations for safety or health purposes. Any certification or other statement of 
compliance with any health or safety-related information in this document shall not be 
attributable to ICEA and is solely the responsibility of the certifier or maker of the 
statement. 



HI 



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IV 



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ANSI/ICEA S-87-640-2006 



FOREWORD 

(This Foreword is not part of this Standard.) 

This Standard provides information on specifying fiber optic cables for outdoor use in 
telecommunications applications. 

The first edition of this Standard was approved by ICEA on March 4, 1992, and the second 
revision on September 15, 1999. A third revision was approved by ICEA on June 8, 2005. 
It was published by ICEA, but was not published as an ANSI approved Standard. This 
revision to the Standard was approved by ICEA on September 13, 2006. This Standard 
was approved by The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) on December 8, 
2006. This Standard will be presented to the Telecommunications Industry Association 
(TIA) with the intent that it be adopted as TIA-472D000-A. The members of the ICEA 
Communications Cable Division Working Group who participated in this project were: 

Ken Chauvin, Chairman and Editor 



M. D. Kinard 


R. Lovie 


J. Rosko 


D. Baker 


J. Shinoski 


D. Taylor 


P. VanVickle 


K. Dunn 



This issue replaces the previous issue of ANSNICEA S-87-640-1999, Standard for 
Optical Fiber Outside Plant Communications Cable. Major changes in this revision 
include the following: 

• Cables with alternate tensile ratings for various applications 

• Addition of Tight Buffer cables for outdoor use 

• Addition of very low temperature cable performance requirements (Annex C) 

• Figure-8 self-supporting cable (Annex D) 

• 1625 nm performance requirements (Annex E) 

This Standard contains six annexes. Annexes C and D are normative and are 
considered part of this Standard. Annex E is normative and considered part of this 
Standard when required by the customer. Annexes A, B, and F are informative and are 
not considered part of this Standard. 

ICEA Standards are adopted in the public interest and are designed to eliminate 
misunderstanding between the manufacturer and user and to assist the user in 
selecting and obtaining proper products for a particular need. The existence of an ICEA 
Standard does not in any respect preclude the manufacture or use of products not 
conforming to this Standard. 



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The user of this Standard is cautioned to observe any applicable health or safety 
regulations and rules relative to the manufacture and use of cable made in conformity 
with this Standard. This Standard hereafter assumes that only properly trained 
personnel using suitable equipment will manufacture, test, install, and/or perform 
maintenance on cables defined by this Standard. 

Questions of interpretation of ICEA Standards can only be accepted in writing and the 
reply shall be provided in writing. Suggestions for improvements in this Standard are 
welcome. Questions and suggestions shall be sent to: 

Secretary 

Insulated Cable Engineers Association, Inc. 

Post Office Box 1568 

Carrollton, GA 30112 
United States of America 



VI 



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ANSI/ICEA S-87-640-2006 



In Memory 

of his more than forty years of contributions to the Wire & Cable Industry; in particular, 

for his fifteen years of leadership in the ICEA Communications Cable Section. During 

this time he was instrumental in the preparation of three major Standards this being one 

of them. This latest revision is hereby dedicated to the memory of: 

H. Marvin McNeil 
April 23, 1927 - October 18, 1998 



VII 



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VIII 



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CONTENTS 
SECTION PAGE 

PART1 INTRODUCTION 1 

1.1 SCOPE 1 

1.2 GENERAL 3 

1.3 UNITS 4 

1.4 DEFINITIONS 4 

1.5 REFERENCES 5 

1.6 INFORMATION TO BE SUPPLIED BY THE USER 5 

1 .7 MODIFICATION OF THIS STANDARD 6 

1.8 QUALITY ASSURANCE 6 

1.9 SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS 6 

PART 2 OPTICAL FIBERS 7 

2.1 GENERAL 7 

2.2 OPTICAL FIBER CLASSES 7 

2.3 OPTICAL FIBER REQUIREMENTS 7 

2.4 OPTICAL FIBER COATING AND REQUIREMENTS 7 

PART 3 OPTICAL FIBER CORE UNITS 10 

3.1 GENERAL 10 

3.2 LOOSE BUFFER TUBES 10 

3.3 OPTICAL FIBER BUNDLES 11 

3.4 OPTICAL FIBER RIBBONS 11 

3.5 TIGHT BUFFERS 12 

PART 4 CABLE AND COMPONENT ASSEMBLY AND IDENTIFICATION 14 

4.1 CABLING OF MULTI-FIBER AND COMPOSITE OPTICAL CABLES 14 

4.2 IDENTIFICATION OF FIBERS WITHIN A UNIT 14 

4.3 IDENTIFICATION OF UNITS WITHIN A CABLE 14 

4.4 IDENTIFICATION OF CONDUCTORS IN COMPOSITE CABLE 14 

4.5 STRENGTH MEMBERS 16 



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CONTENTS (cont.) 
SECTION PAGE 

Part 4: (Continued) 

4.6 ASSEMBLY OF CABLES 16 

4.7 FILLING AND FLOODING MATERIAL 16 

PART 5 COVERINGS 17 

5.1 BINDERS 17 

5.2 CORE WRAP 17 

5.3 SHIELDING, ARMORING, OR OTHER METALLIC COVERINGS 17 

5.4 JACKETS 19 

5.5 JACKET REPAIRS 23 

5.6 OTHER COVERINGS 23 

5.7 RIPCORDS 23 

PART 6 OTHER REQUIREMENTS 24 

6.1 IDENTIFICATION AND DATE MARKING 24 

6.2 OPTICAL CABLE IDENTIFICATION AND OTHER MARKINGS. 25 

6.3 LENGTH MARKING 25 

6.4 CABLE REMARKING 26 

6.5 PACKAGING, PACKING, AND PACKAGE MARKING 26 

PART 7 TESTING, TEST METHODS, AND REQUIREMENTS 28 

7.1 TESTING 28 

7.2 EXTENT OF TESTING 28 

7.3 STANDARD TEST CONDITIONS 28 

7.4 ELECTRICAL TESTING OF CONDUCTIVE MATERIALS 29 

7.5 CONSTRUCTION, COLOR CODE, AND IDENTIFICATION 29 

7.6 JACKET THICKNESS MEASUREMENTS 30 

7.7 JACKET MATERIAL DENSITY MEASUREMENT 30 

7.8 JACKET TENSILE STRENGTH, YIELD STRENGTH, AND ULTIMATE 
ELONGATION TESTS 30 

7.9 JACKET MATERIAL ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT TEST 31 



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CONTENTS (cont.) 
SECTION PAGE 

Part 7: (Continued) 

7.10 ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS CRACK RESISTANCE TEST 32 

7.1 1 JACKET SHRINKAGE TEST 33 

7.12 VERIFICATION OF CABLE LENGTH AND MARKING ACCURACY 33 

7.13 CABLE AND COMPONENT DIMENSIONS 34 

7.14 RIBBON DIMENSIONS 34 

7.15 RIBBON TWIST TEST 35 

7.16 RIBBON RESIDUAL TWIST TEST 36 

7.17 RIBBON SEPARABILITY TEST 36 

7.18 RIPCORD FUNCTIONAL TEST 37 

7.19 MATERIAL COMPATIBILITY AND CABLE AGING TEST 38 

7.20 TIGHT BUFFER STRIPPABILITY TEST 39 

7.21 CABLE LOW AND HIGH TEMPERATURE BEND TEST 40 

7.22 CABLE EXTERNAL FREEZING TEST 41 

7.23 COMPOUND FLOW (DRIP) TEST FOR FILLED CABLE 41 

7.24 CABLE TEMPERATURE CYCLING TEST 42 

7.25 HYDROGEN EVOLUTION IN CABLE 42 

7.26 CABLE SHEATH ADHERENCE TEST 43 

7.27 CYCLIC FLEXING TEST 43 

7.28 WATER PENETRATION TEST 44 

7.29 CABLE IMPACT TEST 44 

7.30 CABLE TENSILE LOADING AND FIBER STRAIN TEST 45 

7.31 CABLE COMPRESSIVE LOADING TEST 47 

7.32 CABLE TWIST TEST 48 

7.33 CABLE LIGHTNING DAMAGE SUSCEPTIBILITY TEST 48 



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CONTENTS (cont.) 
SECTION PAGE 

PART 8 FINISHED CABLE OPTICAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS 50 

8.1 OPTICAL PERFORMANCE 50 

8.2 ATTENUATION COEFFICIENT 51 

8.3 MULTIMODE OPTICAL BANDWIDTH 52 

8.4 OPTICAL POINT DISCONTINUITIES 53 

8.5 CABLE CUTOFF WAVELENGTH (Single-Mode Fibers Only) 53 

8.6 POLARIZATION MODE DISPERSION (Single-Mode Fibers Only) 54 

PART 9 REFERENCES 55 

ANNEXES 

Annex A (Informative) Suggested Information for a Purchase Document 61 

Annex B (Informative) Metallic Covering Materials 63 

Annex C (Normative) Requirements for Very-Low Temperature Applications ....68 

Annex D (Normative) Self-supporting Figure-8 Cables Designs 71 

Annex E (Normative) 1625 nm Cabled Fiber Performance Requirements 78 

Annex F (Informative) ICEA Telecommunications Cable Standards 79 

FIGURES 

Figure 7.1 Ribbon dimensional parameters 35 

Figure 7.2 Ribbon preparation 37 

Figure 7.3 Ribbon separation 37 

Figure D.1 Cable galloping test schematic 77 



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CONTENTS (cont.) 

TABLES PAGE 

Table 1.1 Cable normal temperature ranges 2 

Table 2.1 Multimode optical fiber specification requirements 8 

Table 2.2 Single-mode optical fiber specification requirements 9 

Table 4.1 Individual fiber, unit, and group identification 15 

Table 5.1 Requirements for jackets removed from completed cable 21 

Table 5.2 Jacket thickness requirements 22 

Table 6.1 Year of manufacture marker threads 25 

Table 7.1 Sample preparation and test set-up, jacket tensile properties 31 

Table 7.2 Maximum dimensions of optical fiber ribbons 35 

Table 8.1 Attenuation coefficient performance requirements 50 

Table 8.2 Multimode bandwidth coefficient performance requirements 50 

Table 8.3 Point discontinuity acceptance criteria 51 

Table 8.4 Optical attenuation measurement methods 52 

Table 8.5 Multimode optical bandwidth measurement methods 52 

Table B.1 Thickness of aluminum alloy tapes 63 

Table B.2 Thickness of copper, copper alloy, and bronze tapes 64 

Table B.3 Thickness of copper-steel-copper laminate tapes.... 64 

Table B.4 Stainless steel tape composition 65 

Table B.5 Stainless steel tape physical performance 66 

Table B.6 Thickness of stainless steel tapes 66 

Table B.7 Thickness of steel tapes 66 

Table B.8 Steel tape composition 67 

Table D.1 Outer jacket thickness requirements for figure-8 messenger cables 72 

Table D.2 Dimension requirements for messenger webs 72 

Table E.1 Acceptance criteria for L-Band operation 78 



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PART1 



INTRODUCTION 



1.1 SCOPE 

1.1.1 Products 

This Standard covers optical fiber communications cable intended for outdoor use and 
normally installed aerially, directly buried, or placed in underground ducts. Additional 
requirements for "figured aerial self-supporting cables are included in Annex D, as 
appropriate. Materials, constructions, and performance requirements are included in the, 
Standard, together with applicable test procedures. Refer to other published ICEA 
(ANSI/TIA) cable product standards for information on fiber optic cable requirements for 
other applications: 



• S-83-596: 

• S-101-696: 

• S-1 10-717: 



Optical fiber premises distribution cable (ANSI/TIA-472C000-B) 
Indoor-outdoor optical fiber drop cable (ANSI/TIA-472E000) 
Optical fiber drop cable (ANSI/TIA-472FO00) 



1 .1 .2 Applications Space 

Products covered by this Standard are intended only for operation under conditions 
normally found in communications systems. These products normally convey 
communications signals (voice, video, and data) from point-to-point or point-to-multi-point, 
external to buildings. Products covered by this Standard may be factory terminated with 
connectors or splicing modules. 

When a composite cable is required, the applicable metallic conductor requirements shall 
be as established by agreement between the end user and the cable manufacturer. The 
requirements of ANSI/ICEA S-84-608 should be considered when determining appropriate 
requirements. 

1.1.3 Temperature Ranges 

The normal temperature ranges for cables covered by this Standard are given in 
Table 1-1 

For the purposes of this standard, very-low temperature applications, are defined as 
-50 °C (-58 °F) per 1.4.1.6, and are addressed in Annex C (Normative), which contains 
requirements for lower operating and storage temperatures than listed in Table 1 .1. 



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Table 1.1- Cable normal temperature ranges 



Operation 

Storage and Shipping 

Installation 



ill 



-40 to +70 
-40 to +70 
-30 to +60 



(-40 to +158) 
(-40 to +158) 
(-22 to +140) 



1.1.4 Tensile Rating 

The standard installation tensile rating for cables covered by this Standard is 2670 N 
(600 Ibf). Higher tensile ratings are also acceptable for use. For applications where a 
lower tensile rating is appropriate the standard lower tensile rating is 1330 N (300 Ibf). 
In all cases, the residual load is defined as any load less than or equal to 30 percent of 
the installation tensile rating. 

For self-supporting aerial applications there are additional considerations that need to be 
addressed to ensure that the cable design is appropriate for the self-supporting distance 
and environmental loading conditions. See 7.30 and Annex D for information on figure-8 
self-supporting aerial cable requirements and considerations. 

For aerial applications in which the optical cable is lashed to a separate messenger wire, 
the use of a cable designed for a standard tensile rating for installation by direct burial, 
trenching, or pulling into duct may be adequate. 



1.1.5 Minimum Bend Diameter 

The standard minimum bend diameters for cables covered by this Standard are: 



Residual (Installed): 

Loaded Condition (During Installation): 



20 x Cable O.D. 
40 x Cable O.D. 



For very small cables, such as those installed in miniature ducts, manufacturers may 
specify a fixed cable minimum bend diameter (e.g., 300 mm) that is independent of the 
cable outer diameter (OD). 

For cables not having a circular cross-section, bend diameter requirements are to be 
determined using the thickness (minor axis) as the cable diameter and bending in the 
direction of the preferential bend. 



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1.2 GENERAL 

This Standard is so arranged that cables may be selected from numerous constructions 
covering a broad range of installation and service conditions. Parts 2 to 5 cover the major 
components and assembly of the cables: 

Parts 2 and 3 designate the materials, material characteristics, dimensions, and 
tests applicable to the particular component. 

Part 4 covers assembly, cabling, and identification of the individual optical fibers 
and conductors. 

Part 5 describes coverings, such as binders, wraps, metallic coverings, and 
jacketing of the optical cable. 

Part 6 provides other pertinent requirements not otherwise addressed by Parts 1 
through 5 or by Part 7 of this Standard. 

Part 7 contains the test methods and requirements applicable to completed cables 
and component parts. If there is a conflict between Parts 1 through 6 and Part 7, 
the provisions of Part 7 apply. 

Part 8 contains routinely specified optical performance, requirements, and test 
methods for finished cables. 

Part 9 contains cross-references to other standards and publications. 

Annex A (Informative) contains information for users on ordering the types of 
cable products covered by this Standard. 

Annex B (Informative) contains information on metallic shield and tape materials 
used in some outside plant cable constructions. 

Annex C (Normative) contains information and requirements for cables used in 
"very low temperature" applications (-50 X}). 

Annex D (Normative) contains additional information and requirements on aerial 
self-supporting "figure-8" cable designs with integrated metallic messenger wire. 

Annex E (Normative) contains requirements for 1625 nm performance 
requirements for outside plant cables when required by the customer. 

Annex F (Informative) contains information on other ICEA Standards. 



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1.3 UNITS 



In this Standard, metric (SI) units are used. Their approximate U.S. customary units are 
included where appropriate. Where approximate equivalents in alternate systems are 
included they are provided for information only and in most cases are rounded off for 
measurement convenience. Unless otherwise specified, the Rounding Method of 
ASTM E 29 shall be used. ICEA P-57-653 is a useful guide for metric units used in this 
publication. 



1.4 DEFINITIONS 

For the purposes of this Standard, the following definitions apply. 

1 .4. 1 Cable Classifications 

1.4.1.1 Com posite Cables 

Cables containing both optical fibers and metallic conductors that are intended for 
communications use. 

1.4.1.2Dielectric Cables 

Cables which contain no metallic members or other electrically conductive materials. 

1.4.1. 3 Figure-8 Cables 

A specific type of aerial self-supporting cable design in which the outermost jacket is co- 
extruded over the cable core and an integral messenger wire, with the core and 
messenger separated by a thin webbing of the jacket material. The resulting 
characteristic "figure-8" shape gives these cables their name. 

1 . 4.1. 4Hybrid Cables 

Cables which contain more than one type of optical fiber. 

1 . 4.1. SMetallic Cables 

Cables that contain conductive members including those not normally intended to transmit 
information (voice, video, or data), such as metallic strength members, sheaths, shields, 
or armors. This also includes elements intended for toning/locating or powering. 



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1 .4.1 .6Very Low Temperature Cables 

Cables designed, specified and qualified for use in applications where the low-end 
temperature extremes may reach -50 V. Refer to An nex C (Normative) which contains 
information and requirements for cables specified for use in very low temperature 
applications. 

1.4.2 Jackets and Sheaths 

In this Standard, the term "jacket" refers to a continuous non-metallic covering while 
"sheath w refers to the protective elements covering the cable core, which may include a 
combination of metallic coverings, jackets, strength members, and the like. 

1.4.3 Optical Fiber and Electric/Electronic Terms 

Refer to TIA^WO for definitions of other optical fiber terms. Refer to ANSI/IEEE 100 for 
definitions of other electrical and electronic terms. 

1.4.4 Detail Specification 

The term "Detail Specification" shall be used to refer to any requirement or set of 
requirements that are specific to the user's purchase. In case of conflict between a 
requirement called out in a Detail Specification and this Standard, the requirements of this 
Standard may be modified by agreement between the manufacturer and user. This 
definition does not apply to the optical fiber Detail Specifications referenced in Table 2.1 
and Table 2.2 of this Standard. 



1.5 REFERENCES 

All documents referenced herein are listed in Part 9. 

1.6 INFORMATION TO BE SUPPLIED BY THE USER 

When requesting proposals from cable manufacturers, the prospective user should 
describe the cable by referencing the pertinent Paragraphs of this Standard. To help 
avoid misunderstandings and possible misapplication of cable, the user should also 
provide pertinent information concerning the intended application. Recommended 
ordering information is summarized in Annex A. 



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1.7 MODIFICATION OF THIS STANDARD 

Any part of this Standard may be modified by agreement between the manufacturer and 
user, but such modifications shall be clearly denoted as exceptions to the Standard. In 
this Standard, requirements which are recognized to have various options, but for which 
preferred values are given, have been introduced by phrases such as, "Unless otherwise 
specified," "as mutually agreed upon," or "Unless otherwise modified by manufacturer and 
user." Requirements which must be determined in each case are introduced by phrases 
such as, "...as agreed upon between manufacturer and user," or "...as mutually agreed 
upon." 



1.8 QUALITY ASSURANCE 

It is the responsibility of the manufacturer to establish a quality assurance system 
consistent with ANSI/ASQC Q9000, ISO 9001, TL 9000®, or an alternate system 
acceptable to the user, which will assure conformance with the requirements of this 
Standard. When the user wishes to require a specific quality assurance program or 
special testing procedures, agreement between the user and the manufacturer should 
be reached before the order is placed. 

1.9 SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS 

Materials in the cable shall present no dermal or environmental hazards as defined by 
current industry Standards, or by applicable federal or state laws, codes and 
regulations. The manufacturer and user of cables made in accordance with this 
Standard are cautioned to observe any applicable health or safety rules and 
regulations relative to their manufacture and use. This Standard hereafter assumes 
that the manufacture, testing, installation, and maintenance of the fiber optic cables 
defined herein will be performed only by properly trained personnel, using suitable 
equipment, employing appropriate safety precautions, and working in accordance with 
applicable local, state, and national safety requirements. 



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PART 2 
OPTICAL FIBERS 



2.1 GENERAL 



The optical fiber used in the cable shall comply with the requirements per the latest issue 
of TIA-492000, Generic Specification for Optical Waveguide Fibers, in accordance with 
2.2 through 2.4. 



2.2 OPTICAL FIBER CLASSES 

Optical fibers used shall be of a type as listed in Table 2.1 for multimode fibers and Table 
2.2 for single-mode fibers. 



2.3 OPTICAL FIBER REQUIREMENTS 

2.3.1 Unless otherwise specified, optical fibers shall conform to the requirements of the 
Specifications listed in Table 2.1 for multimode fibers and Table 2.2 for single-mode 
fibers. The fiber attributes of Tables 2.1 and 2.2 are included for information, only. 
Refer to the referenced fiber Specifications for normative values. 

2.3.2 Each optical fiber shall be continuous throughout its length such that the 
requirements of Parts 7 and 8 of this Standard are met. 

2.3.3 Unless otherwise specified, splices made in optical fibers during the fiber or cable 
manufacturing process shall conform to the requirements of the latest issue of 
TIA-4920000. 

2.3.4 Unless otherwise specified, any section of an optical fiber and its coating, including 
any section containing a factory splice, shall meet the same dimensional, 
mechanical, optical, and environmental requirements as un-spliced fiber, and shall 
be capable of meeting the performance requirements of Parts 7 and 8. 



2.4 OPTICAL FIBER COATING AND REQUIREMENTS 

2.4.1 Optical fiber types I and IV (glass core and glass cladding) shall be coated with a 
suitable material to preserve the intrinsic strength of the glass. Such coated fibers 
are termed "Primary Coated Fibers." 

2.4.2 The thickness of the primary coating(s) shall be such that the applicable 
requirements of this Standard are met. Nominal coating diameters for standard 

7 



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fibers are 250 ± 15 nm; other coating diameters are acceptable provided that all 
other applicable requirements are met. Dimensions shall be measured according 
to the methods of 7.1 3. 

2.4.3 The diameter over the coating is defined as the diameter of the fiber as used in the 
cable; that is, the diameter includes any coloring thickness if the fiber is colored, 
and is the uncolored coating diameter if the fiber is not colored. 

2.4.4 Coating materials used shall meet the requirements of Parts 7 and 8 of this 
Standard or as otherwise permitted by the user. 

2.4.5 The coating(s) shall be uniform and concentric with the glass. Coating(s) shall 
be removable by mechanical means without damage to the fiber(s) by using 
manufacturer's recommended procedures. The strip force of the optical fiber's 
protective coating shall be measured according to FOTP-178. The force 
required to remove 30 + 3 mm of the fiber's protective coating shall be between 
1.0 N and 9.0 N. 



Table 2.1 - Multimode optical fiber specification requirements 



d) 



Fiber Type 



TIA/EIA Specification Reference 



Sectional 



Blank Detail 



Detail 



50|im 



492AO00 



492AA00 



492AAAB 



50 urn 



(2) 



492A000 



492AA00 



492AAAC 



62.5 urn 



Fiber Class and 
Subclass 



492AO0O 



492AA00 



Diameters ftim) 



Core 



Cladding 



492AAAA 



Numerical 
Aperture 



la 



50 +/- 3.0 



125.0 ±2.0 



0.200+/- 0.015 



62;5 +/- 3.0 



125.0 ±2.0 



0.275+/- 0.015 



Note 

1) Fiber specifications listed herein are provided for convenience, but are dynamic and subject 
to change. Users should refer to the relevant TIA-492 detailed fiber specification for current 
requirements 

2) 850 nm laser-optimized 50 pm fiber 

3) These attributes are defined by the Detailed Fiber Specifications called out above. The 
values are subject to change, and are included here for information, only. Refer to the latest 
fiber Specifications for current normative values. 



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Table 2.2 - Single-mode optical fiber specification requirements (1, 2) 



Fiber Class 


TIA/EIA Specification Reference 13 * 




Fiber Type 


Sectional 


Blank Detail 


Detail 


IVa 


Dispersion Unshifted 


492C000 


492CA00 


492CAAA 


IVa 


Dispersion Unshifted 
Low Water Peak 


492C000 


492CA00 


492CAAB 


IVb 


Dispersion Shifted 


— 


492BB00 


— 


IVd 


Non-zero Dispersion 


492EO0O 


492EA00 


— 


^^s^g^^^^^smm^m^mmmmmmm^^^^m^m^. 


Fiber 
Class 


Diameter frim) 


Chromatic Dispersion 


Mode 

Field 
Diameter 
(Nominal) 


Mode 

Field 
Diameter 
Tolerance 


Cladding 


Zero 

Dispersion 

Wavelength 

(nm) 


Zero 

Dispersion 

Wavelength 

Slope 

Maximum 

ps/(nm 2 -km) 


Dispersion 
Coefficient 
(ps/nm-km) 


IVa 


8.8-9.3 @ 
1310 nm 


±0.5 


125.0 ±1.0 


1300-1324 


0.093 


Not 
Applicable 


IVb (5) 


7.8-8.5 @ 
1550 nm 


±0.7 


125.0 ±1.0 


1535-1565 


0.085 


<2.7 .. 


IVd 


7.2-1 1.0 @ 
1550 nm 


±0.7 


125.0 ±1.0 


Not 
Applicable 


Not 
Applicable 


(6) 


Notes: 

1) Fiber specifications listed herein are provided for convenience, but are dynamic and subject to change. ' 
Users should refer to the relevant TiA-492 detailed fiber specification for current requirements 

2) Missing references, including blank spaces in Table 2-2, indicate that no fiber Specification is available. 

3) When no Detail Specification is available, fiber requirements shall be at the discretion of the cable 
manufacturer, unless otherwise agreed upon between manufacturer and user. 

4) These attributes are defined by the Specifications called out above. The values are subject to change, and 
are included here for information only. Refer to the latest fiber Specifications for current normative values. 

5) Fiber class IVb is provided for historical reference. 

6) For class IVd dispersion coefficient: The manufacturer's declared wavelength range, A,min to Xmax, shall 
satisfy 1530 nm < ^min < X < Xmax < 1565 nm. The absolute value of the dispersion coefficient D{\) shall 
satisfy 1 .0 = Dmin < |D| < Dmax = 10.0 ps/nm-km in the wavelength range of A,min and A.max. The absolute 
value of the difference between Dmin and Dmax shall be < 5,0 ps/nm-km. 



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PART 3 



OPTICAL FIBER CORE UNITS 



3.1 GENERAL 

This Part defines specific types of units that may be used in cables designed for 
installation in the outside plant, such as: loose buffer tubes, optical fiber bundles, 
optical fiber ribbons, and tight bufFered fibers. Fiber units are not limited to these types. 
Other types of units may be used provided that they meet the intent of Parts 3 and 4. 



3.2 LOOSE BUFFER TUBES 

Loose buffer tubes consist of optical fiber(s) or optical fiber ribbon(s) inside a tube that 
isolates the fibers from outside stress. The inside dimension is greater than the 
maximum dimension of the combined optical elements surrounded by the tuba The 
space between the optical elements and the inside of the tube contains a suitable 
water blocking material. Loose tubes are typically employed as single central units, or 
in stranded configurations in multiple unit designs. 

3.2.1 Loose Buffer Tube Dimensions 



Buffer tube dimensions are set by the manufacturer to ensure that the applicable 
performance requirements of this Standard are met. Dimensions shall be measured 
according to the methods of 7.1 3. 

3.2.2 Loose Buffer Tube Requirements 



3.2.2.1 The loose buffer tubes shall be constructed such that the buffer tube and 
finished cable meet all applicable performance requirements specified in 
Part 7. 

3.2.2.2 The loose buffer tubes shall be uniform and concentric. Buffer tubes must 
be removable, without damage to the fibers, using the manufacturer's 
recommended procedures. 

3.2.2.3 Each loose buffer tube, in multi-tube cable designs, shall be uniquely 
identifiable. Methods shall conform to 4.3. For cables having a single (i.e., 
central) buffer tube, no specific identification method is required. 

3.2.2.4 Aging requirements are addressed in 7.19. 



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3.3 OPTICAL FIBER BUNDLES 

Bundles are arrays of color-coded optical fibers, held together and identified by a color- 
coded binder, that reside in a buffer tube(s). 

The binder color code shall conform to 4.3. 



3.4 OPTICAL FIBER RIBBONS 

A ribbon is a planar array of optical fibers. 

3.4.1 Ribbon Identification 

Each ribbon shall be uniquely identifiable. Methods shall conform to 4.3. Generally, 
ribbons comprise one unit. However, ribbons may contain more than one unit, in which 
case separate units shall be appropriately identified. 

3.4.2 Fiber Identification in Ribbons 

Each fiber within a ribbon shall be uniquely identifiable. Methods shall conform to 4.2 
and 4.3, as applicable. 

3.4.3 Ribbon Fiber Counts 

Common fiber counts for optical fiber ribbons are: 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24. Fiber counts in 
ribbons shall be established by agreement between manufacturer and user. 

3.4.4 Ribbon Requirements 

Ribbons shall be constructed so that the finished cable meets all applicable 
performance requirements specified in Part 7. The following additional requirements 
pertain specifically to ribbons: 

3.4.4.1 Ribbon Dimensions 

Certain ribbon dimensions may be important in cable design, in splice apparatus, or for 
successful splicing of one ribbon to another. All measurements shall be referenced 
from either the cladding edge or the center of the core. Fiber coatings shall not be used 
for reference. Important dimensions are shown in Figure 7.1 and listed in Table 7.2. 
Measure the attributes as agreed between manufacturer and user, and as directed by 
7.14. 



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3.4.4.2 Ribbon Twist Test 

Test ribbons for robustness per 7.15. 

3.4.4.3 Ribbon Residual Twist Test 
Test for ribbon residual twist per 7.16. 

3.4.4.4 Ribbon Separability Test 
Measure ribbon separability per 7.17. 

3.4.4.5 Fiber Crossovers in Ribbons 

The fibers shall be parallel and not cross over throughout the length of the ribbon. 

3.4.4.6 Ribbon Strippability 

At least 25 mm (1.0 in) of the ribbon matrix and the fibers' protective coatings shall be 
removable with commercially available stripping tools from aged and unaged ribbons 
with no fiber breakage. Any remaining coating residue shall be readily removable using 
isopropyl alcohol wipes. Aging requirements are addressed in 7.19 (See 7.19,2.1). 

3.5 TIGHT BUFFERS 

A tight buffer consists of one or more layers of buffer material applied around the 
individual optical fiber, so that it is in contact with the coating of the fiber. 

3.5.1 Tight Buffer Dimensions 

Buffer dimensions are established by the cable manufacturer to ensure that the 
applicable performance requirements of this Standard are met. Dimensions shall be 
measured according to the methods of 7.13. 

3.5.2 Tight Buffer Requirements 

3.5.2.1 The tight buffer shall be constructed so that the finished cable meets all 
applicable performance requirements specified in Part 7. 

3.5.2.2 The tight buffer shall be uniform and concentric. It must be removable, 
without damage to the fibers, using the manufacturer's recommended 
procedures. 



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3.5.2.3 Each tight buffered fiber shall be uniquely identifiable. Methods shall conform 
to 4.2. 

3.5.2.4 The tight buffered fiber shall be strippable in accordance with 7.20. 



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PART 4 
CABLE AND COMPONENT ASSEMBLY AND IDENTIFICATION 

4.1 CABLING OF MULTI-FIBER AND COMPOSITE OPTICAL CABLES 

Optical fiber communications cables shall be assembled in accordance with this Part. 

4.2 IDENTIFICATION OF FIBERS WITHIN A UNIT 

4.2.1 In units with multiple fibers, each fiber in the unit shall be readily identifiable. 
Identification shall be provided by means of color coding, by positional configuration, 
or by other means as mutually agreed upon between manufacturer and user. 

4.2.2 For color-coding, the color order and color definitions designated for identification of 
individual fibers shall be in accordance with TlA-598, Optical Fiber Cable Color 
Coding. The order is listed for convenience in Table 4.1 . 

4.3 IDENTIFICATION OF UNITS WITHIN A CABLE 

4.3.1 In cables with multiple units, each unit shall be readily identifiable. Identification 
shall be provided by means of color coding, printed legends, bar codes, positional 
configuration, tapes, threads, or by other means as mutually agreed upon. 

4.3.2 For color coding, the color order and color definitions designated for identification of 
individual units within a cable shall be in accordance with TIA-598. The order is 
listed for convenience in Table 4.1. 

4.4 IDENTIFICATION OF CONDUCTORS IN COMPOSITE CABLE 

Insulated paired electrical conductors employed in composite cables shall be identified 
by the color code required by ICEA S-84-608. If non-paired electrical conductors are 
used, colors shall be as agreed upon by the manufacturer and user. 



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Table 4.1 - Individual fiber, unit, and group identification 



Position number 


Base color and tracer 


Abbreviation/print legend 


1 
2 
3 
4 


Blue 

Orange 

Green 

Brown 


1 orBLoM-BL 

2 or OR or 2-OR 

3 or GR or 3-GR 

4 or BR or 4-BR 


5 
6 

7 
8 


Slate 

White 

Red 

Black 


5orSLor5-SL 
6orWHor6-WH 

7 or RD or 7-RD 

8 or BK or 8-BK 


9 

10 
11 
12 


Yellow 
Violet 
Rose 
Aqua 


9orYLor9-YL 

10orVlor10-VI 

11 orRSor11-RS 

12orAQor12-AQ 


13 
14 
15 
16 


Blue with Black Tracer 

Orange with Black Tracer 

Green with Black Tracer 

Brown with Black Tracer 


13orD/BLor13-D/BL 11 ' 
14orD/ORor14-D/OR 
15orD/GRor15-D/GR 
16orD/BRor16-D/BR 


17 
18 
19 
20 


Slate with Black Tracer 

White with Black Tracer 

Red with Black Tracer 

Black with White Tracer 


17orD/SLor17-D/SL 

18orD/WHor18-D/WH 

19orD/RDor19-D/RD 

20 or D/BK or 20-D/BK (2> 


21 
22 
23 
24 


Yellow with Black Tracer 
Violet with Black Tracer 
Rose with Black Tracer 
Aqua with Black Tracer 


21 orD/YLor21-D/YL 
22orD/Vlor22-DA/| 

23 or D/RS or 23-D/RS 

24 or D/AQ or 24-D/AQ 


25 
26 
27 
28 


Blue with Double Black Tracer 

Orange with Double Black Tracer 

Green with Double Black Tracer 

Brown with Double Black Tracer 


25 or DD/BL or 25-DD/BL w 
26orDD/ORor14-DD/OR 
27orDD/GRor15-DD/GR 
28 or DD/BR or 16-DD/BR 


29 
30 
31 
32 


Slate with Double Black Tracer 

White with Double Black Tracer 

Red with Double Black Tracer 

Black with Double White Tracer 


29orDD/SLor17-DD/SL 

30 or DD/WH or 1 8-DD/WH 

31 or DD/RD or 19-DD/RD 
32 or DD/BK or 20-DD/BK (2) 


33 
34 
35 
36 


Yellow with Double Black Tracer 
Violet with Double Black Tracer 
Rose with Double Black Tracer 
Aqua with Double Black Tracer 


33orDD/YLor21-DD/YL 
34 or DD/VI or 22-DD/VI 

35 or DD/RS or 23-D D/RS 

36 or DD/AQ or 24-DD/AQ 


Notes: 

1) "Dr denotes a dashed mark or tracer. That is, D/BL is Dash/Blue, meaning Blue with a tracer. 

2) Pertaining to positions 20 and 32, yellow tracers are also allowed. 

3) "DD/" denotes a double dashed mark or tracer. That is, DD/BL is Double Dash/Blue, meaning 
Blue with a double tracer. 



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4.5 STRENGTH MEMBERS 



Central or non-central strength members, or both, may be included in the cable design. 
These members may be metallic, non-metallic, or a combination of both. Strength 
members shall provide sufficient tensile strength for installation and residual loads to 
meet the applicable performance requirements of Part 7. 

The messenger wires used for aerial self-supporting applications shall meet the 
requirements of Annex D. 



4.6 ASSEMBLY OF CABLES 

4.6.1 The required number of optical fibers and metallic conductors shall be assembled 
into layers as in a concentric design, or into units as in a unit-type construction, 
or into other suitable constructions such as flat ribbon or slotted core 
configurations. 

4.6.2 When tapes or threads are used as unit identifiers, their colors shall conform to 
the requirements of TIA-598. The lay length of identifiers, when used, is not 
specified, but the length shall assure adequate segregation and identification of 
the cable components enclosed. 

4.6.3 Other components may be used as appropriate for specialized needs. For 
example, cable fillers may be used to occupy the interstitial spaces between 
cable elements. An inner jacket may be applied for protection or other purposes. 

4.7 FILLING AND FLOODING MATERIAL 

4.7.1 Filling material may be used in the buffer tube to block the ingress and axial 
migration of water through the cable core. Tapes or other materials may be used 
which meet the intent of this paragraph and the requirements of Part 7. 

4.7.2 Flooding material may be used in the cable core or sheath interface(s) for the 
purpose of preventing the ingress and migration of water. Tapes or other 
materials may be used which meet the intent of this paragraph and the 
requirements of Part 7. 

4.7.3 The filling and flooding materials shall be compatible with all components of the 
cable that they contact. The elements typically in contact with the filling material 
are optical fibers, tight buffered fibers, optical fiber ribbons, and buffer tubes. 
The elements typically in contact with the flooding compound are buffer tubes, 
strength members, metal tapes, and jackets. Refer to 7.19 for methods to test 
material compatibility. 



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PART 5 
COVERINGS 



5.1 BINDERS 

If required for manufacturing reasons, a binder may be applied over the core, core wrap, 
metallic shield(s), or armor(s). Binders may also be used for unit or multi-unit identifiers 
as specified in 4.6.2. 



5.2 CORE WRAP 

Cable cores may be covered by one or more layers of core wrap material. 

5.3 SHIELDING, ARMORING, OR OTHER METALLIC COVERINGS 

5.3.1 General 

If shielding, armoring, or other metallic covering is required for a specific construction, 
requirements shall be established by agreement between manufacturer and user. A 
shielding or armoring system may consist of single-tape or dual-tape constructions. 

For the purpose of this Standard, in dual-tape constructions the term "shielding-tape* 
shall refer to a tape containing a highly conductive metal, such as copper or aluminum, 
which is present in the cable primarily for its electrical properties. In addition to tape, 
shielding may also consist of a serving, wrap, or braid of wires of various metals and 
gauges. The term "armoring tape" shall refer to a tape containing lower conductivity 
metal, such as steel or stainless steel, which is present in the cable primarily for 
mechanical protection of the cable core. Care should be used when putting dissimilar 
metals into electrical contact with each other. Coatings, claddings, or other methods of 
protection may be necessary to prevent galvanic interaction. 

Shielding may be applied to a cable for any of several reasons including, but not limited 
to: lightning protection, bonding and grounding considerations, and electrical shielding. 

Armoring may be applied to a cable for any of several reasons including, but not limited 
to: rodent resistance, termite resistance, environmental protection, and general 
mechanical protection. 



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5.3.1.1 Rodent resistance 

Cables not protected by conduits or trays may require the use of a rodent resistant outer 
sheath. Prospective users are advised to contact the cable manufacturer for 
information relating to the test methodology and rodent resistance of their cable product. 

5.3.1.2 Lightning resistance 

The Lightning Damage Susceptibility Test is described in FOTP-181. The lightning 
damage susceptibility of a finished cable is dependent upon the cable construction and 
diameter. The lightning test in FOTP-181 only simulates some aspects of real lightning. 
Additionally, the lightning protection rating required for a particular application is difficult 
to accurately assess. Users of this Standard are cautioned that a particular cable 
design should be tested in accordance with FOTP-181 in order to assess its lightning 
protection capability. Commonly used categories in which cables may be classified are 
presented in 7.33. 

This test in not used for figure-8 self-supporting cables which utilize a metallic 
messenger. These messengers are typically well-grounded and have current 
capabilities far in excess of that intended for FOTP-181 . 

5.3.2 Metallic Covering Materials 

Finished cable utilizing tape shielding, armoring, or other metallic covering material shall 
meet the completed cable requirements of this Standard. These metallic covering 
materials shall be electrically continuous throughout the cable length. Refer to 7.4.2 for 
test methods. 

Tape materials and conductivity are not specified. Refer to Annex B for design 
information and historic data on metallic covering materials. 

5.3.3 Metallic Covering Fabrication 

5.3.3.1 Shield and Armor Application 

Cable shield or armoring tape(s), if present, shall be applied over the core for a single 
jacketed construction, and over the inner jacket for a double-jacketed construction. 
Additional applications of jacket and armor may be applied as required. Shields and 
armors may be flat, corrugated, or interlocking. 

When a dual-tape construction is specified by the Detail Specification, in which both 
shielding and armoring tapes are to be used, the armoring tape shall be applied directly 
over the shielding tape unless otherwise specified in the Detail Specification. 



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5.3.3.2 Shield and Armor Corrugation 

When corrugated, shield and armor corrugations shall be at right angles to the 
longitudinal axis of the cable. The corrugation profile shall be approximately sinusoidal. 
Shield and armors shall not split, crack, or tear as a result of corrugating and forming. 

5.3.3.3 Shield and Armor Overlap 

When a dual-tape shielding and armoring construction is provided the edges of the 
inner shielding tape may overlap, but any overlap shall not be coincidental with the 
overlap of the outer armor tape. If the inner shield tape does not overlap, the gap 
between the edges of the formed shield tape shall not exceed 5 mm (0.2 in) plus 4 % of 
the total circumference as measured over the core, or over the inner jacket 

All single tape shields or armors applied over cores (or over inner jackets for double 
jacketed cables) and all outer armor tapes applied over an inner-shield tape shall have 
an overlapping edge. Alternatively, armors may have welded edge joints, but such 
constructions shall meet the intent of this Standard, and shall have requirements as 
agreed upon between manufacturer and user. 

5.3.3.4Splicing of Shield and Armor 

The breaking strength of any section of shield or armor containing a splice shall not be less 
than 80% of the breaking strength of an adjacent non-spliced section of equal width. 

Splices in tapes shall be electrically continuous. When two resin-coated tapes are to be 
joined, the coatings may be removed prior to making the splice. For shielding tapes, aim 
(3 ft) section of tape containing a splice shall have an electrical resistance not greater than 
110% of the resistance of an adjacent non-spliced section of shield of equal width. 

The electrical resistance value for armor tape splices is not specified. 



5.4 JACKETS 

5.4.1 General 

Jackets for optical fiber cables shall meet the dimensional, electrical, physical, and 
environmental requirements specified in the following paragraphs and in Part 7 of this 
Standard. Jackets shall be applied to assemblies of optical fibers or to assemblies of 
optical fibers and electrical conductors, with or without intervening materials (core wraps, 
metallic coverings, etc.), as appropriate. 

Jackets shall be smooth, free from holes and other defects, and shall not adhere to 
underlying conductor insulation, fibers, tight buffered fibers, buffer tubes, or to sub-unit 
jackets, as applicable. See 5.5 for jacket repairs. 

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5.4.2 Jacket Materials 

Unless otherwise specified, the jacket compound(s) (raw material) used shall be a 
polyethylene material of one of the four types listed below. After application, the compound 
shall be capable of meeting all finished cable jacket requirements specified herein. The 
raw material shall contain an antioxidant to provide long term stabilization. For black 
jackets, the raw material shall contain a minimum concentration of 2.35 percent furnace 
black, measured in accordance with ASTM D 1603, to provide ultraviolet shielding. Both 
the antioxidant and the furnace black (when used) shall be compounded into the 
polyethylene before jacket extrusion. Acceptable jacket materials are: 

Type L1. Material shall be in conformance with the requirements of ASTM D 1248, 
Type I, Class C, Category 4 or 5, Grade J3. This type generally corresponds to a 
composition that incorporates low density polyethylene as the base resin. 

Type L2. Material shall be in conformance with the requirements of ASTM D 1248, 
Type I, Class C, Category 4 or 5, Grade J3. This type generally corresponds to a 
composition that incorporates linear low density polyethylene as the base resin. 

Type M. Material shall be in conformance with the requirements of ASTM D 1248, 
Type II, Class C, Category 4 or 5, Grade J4. This type generally corresponds to a 
composition that incorporates medium density polyethylene as the base resin. 

Type H. Material shall be in conformance with the requirements of ASTM D 1248, 
Type III, Class C, Category 4 or 5, Grade J4 or J5. This type generally corresponds 
to a composition that incorporates high density polyethylene as the base resin. 

Overjackets (e.g., Nylon, PVC, etc.) may be applied to the completed cable for certain 
applications. Materials used in such modified cables shall meet requirements as 
established between the manufacturer and end user. 

5.4.3 Jacket Requirements 

Unless otherwise stated, jackets produced from the materials listed in 5.4.2 and removed 
from the finished product shall meet the applicable requirements specified in Table 5.1 and 
in 5.4.3 through 5.5. 



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Table 5.1 - Requirements for jackets removed from completed cable (1) 



Polyethylene Material 


PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE BY 
JACKET TYPE 


PROPERTY (2) 


Test 
Method 


L1 


L2 


M 


H 


Density^ - g/cm a 

- Minimum 

- Maximum 


7.7 


0.920 
0.940 


0.925 
0.945 


0.940 
0.955 


0.952 
0.973 


Ultimate Elongation 
- Unaged % Minimum 


7.8 


400 


400 


400 


300 


Yield Strength 

- Mpa (psi) Minimum 


7.8 


6.9 
(1000) 


8.3 
(1200) 


11.0 
(1600) 


19.3 
(2800) 


Absorption Coefficient <4) 
- ABS/mm Minimum 


7.9 


400 


400 


400 


400 


Environmental Stress 
Crack Resistance <5) 
Hours - Minimum 
Failures Allowed 
- ASTMD1693Cond. 


7.10 


48 

2/10 

A 


48 

2/10 

A 


48 

2/10 

B 


48 

2/10 

B 


Environmental Stress 
Crack Resistance (6) 
(small diameter cables) 
- Failures Allowed 


7.10 


0/1 


0/1 


0/1 


0/1 


Jacket Shrinkback 

- Oven Temp. - °C 

- Test Time - hours 

- Shrinkback % Maximum 


7.11 


100 ±1 
4 
5 


100 ±1 
4 
5 


115 ± 1 

4 
5 


115 ± 1 

4 
5 


Notes: 

1 ) Jackets shall be removed from bonded sheath constructions in accordance with one 
of the two procedures provided under the "Jacket Notch Test" of ASTM D 4565. 

2) Test methods designating "clean sample" require that any residual flooding or bonding 
compounds be removed from the surface of the sample by other than chemical means. 
Those not so designated shall include these materials if they cling to the jacket. 

For jackets with embedded strength members, all tests except Environmental Stress 
Crack Resistance are for the material without the strength members. 

3) The material densities are listed in terms of the as-received resin. The density of the 
natural resin is characteristically lower by some amount, due to the addition of carbon 
black and other additives. As a ruie-of-thumb, the density of the natural resin is 0.012 
g/cm3 lower when using a nominal concentration of carbon black (2.6% by weight),. 

4) Requirements for Absorption Coefficient of the raw material may be substituted for 
tests on completed cable. 

5) This Stress Crack Resistance requirement applies only to cables having an outside 
diameter of 30 mm (1.2 in) or greater. 

6) For cables with outside diameters less than 30 mm (1 .2 in), Stress Crack Resistance 
requirements shall be accomplished by testing the cable as a whole in accordance with 
7.10.2. 



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Jackets made from materials not specifically listed in 5.4.2 shall also meet the applicable 
requirements specified in Table 5.1, or equivalent requirements as established between 
manufacturer and user, and 5.4.3 through 5.5, and in Part 7. 

Samples of finished cable that have a metallic covering under the jacket shall also meet the 
sheath adherence requirement of 7.26. 

5.4.4 Inner Jacket(s) 

When required for a specific construction, or for manufacturing purposes, cable cores or 
sub-units within the core, or both, may be covered by an inner jacket(s). Unless 
otherwise specified, a polyethylene inner jacket shall be used which meets all the 
requirements of an outer jacket; however, black, natural, or colored polyethylene may 
be used. In the case of natural or colored polyethylene, the requirements for absorption 
coefficient and the inclusion of furnace black are waived. 

5.4.5 Outer Jacket 

5.4.5.1 Unless otherwise indicated by Part 7, the thickness of the overall outer jacket 
shall conform to the requirements of Table 5.2. Jacket thickness 
measurements shall be performed in accordance with 7.6. Jacket thickness 
measurements shall exclude any polyethylene formed in metal tape 
corrugations or between strength members. The eccentricity of the jacket 
shall be calculated in accordance with 7.6. 

5.4.5.2 For jackets with embedded strength elements, the eccentricity shall be 
calculated at the location of opposing strength members and shall include the 
dimension of the strength member in the effective thickness. Eccentricity 
shall be defined in accordance with ASTM D 4565. 



Table 5.2 - Jacket thickness requirements 



Attribute 


Construction 


Measured Value 


Minimum Jacket Thickness 
at any point 


Inner jacket, multiple-jacket 
cables 


Per manufacturers 
specification 


Outer jacket, multiple-jacket 
cables 


0.8 mm (0.031 in.) 


Single jacket, no armor 


0.9 mm (0.035 in.) 


Single jacket, armor 


1.0 mm (0.039 in.) 


Embedded strength 
members 


0.5 mm (0.020 in.) 


Maximum Eccentricity 


All types 


40% 



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5.5 JACKET REPAIRS 

Jackets may be repaired in accordance with good commercial practice. Cables with 
repaired jackets must be capable of meeting all requirements of this Standard applicable to 
cables of the type being repaired; 



5.6 OTHER COVERINGS 

Overjackets of materials defined above or other materials may be used for special 
circumstances. Some examples are additional polyethylene for added ground fault 
resistance, nylon for insect or chemical resistance, and others. Overjacket dimensions, 
adhesion levels, etc. shall be as agreed upon between manufacturer and user. 

Other coverings (e.g., tape wraps and braids in metallic, non-metallic, or both forms) may 
also be used. 

The modified cable shall meet requirements as established between the manufacturer and 
end user. 



5J RIPCORDS 

Ripcords may be included at the discretion of the manufacturer or as requested by the end 
user. When included in a cable, ripcords shall be capable of slitting the jacket/armor, 
without breaking, for a length of one meter (3.3 feet) at the specified installation 
temperatures in accordance with 7,18. 



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PART 6 
OTHER REQUIREMENTS 



6-1 IDENTIFICATION AND DATE MARKING 

Each length of optical fiber cable shall be permanently identified as to manufacturer and 
year of manufacture using one or more of the following methods: 

6,1.1 Identification and date marks shall be indented, embossed, or surface printed in 
white on the outer jacket. The marking characters shall be dimensioned and 
spaced to produce good legibility. The marking method used shall produce a clear, 
durable, distinguishable, and contrasting marking. The characters shall be spaced 
at intervals not exceeding 24 in (610 mm) for products marked in feet, or not 
exceeding 1 m (40 in) for products marked in metric units. The marking shall 
meet print durability requirements in accordance with 7.5.2. 

6-1.2 A tape bearing the manufacturer's name and year of manufacture may also be 
inserted between the core and jacket. The markings on the tape shall be spaced at 
intervals not exceeding 24 in (610 mm) for products marked in feet, or not 
exceeding 1 m (40 in) for products marked in metric units. 

6.1.3 Manufacturer and year of manufacture marking may also be provided by including 
marker threads or tapes in the cable constructions as follows: 

6,1.3.1 Manufacturer's identification shall be by marker thread combinations assigned by 
the relevant Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory. 

6.1.3.2When used, year of manufacture marker threads or tapes shall identify the last digit 
of the year as indicated in Table 6. 1 . 

6.1.3.3When used, manufacturer and/or year markers shall have no adverse effects on the 
optical and electrical characteristics of the cable. 

6.1.4 The marking may also be printed on the core wrap, if used. Core wrap markings 
shall be spaced at intervals not exceeding 24 in (610 mm) for products marked in 
feet, or not exceeding 1 m (40 in) for products marked in metric units. 



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Table 6.1 - Year of manufacture marker threads 



Year Ending In 


Marker Color 


1 


Blue 


2 


Orange 


3 


Green 


4 


Brown 


5 


Slate 


6 


White 


7 


Red 


8 


Black 


9 


Yellow 





Violet 



6.2 OPTICAL CABLE IDENTIFICATION AND OTHER MARKINGS 

6.2.1 Unless otherwise specified, completed cable shall bear appropriate markings to 
indicate that it is an optical cable. Such marks shall be applied in accordance 
with 6.1.1 or 6.1.2. Manufacturer's trade names or other appropriate legends 
may be used to fulfill this requirement. 

6.2.2 Cable suitable for direct burial applications shall be appropriately marked as 
required by Section 35 of the National Electrical Safety Code (NESC), ANSI C2. 
The appropriate identification symbol for communication cable (i.e. handset 
symbol) shall be indented or embossed in the outermost cable jacket. 

6.2.3 Other appropriate markings shall be applied as required for the particular product 
or as mutually agreed upon between manufacturer and user. 



6.3 LENGTH MARKING 

Each length of cable shall be continuously and sequentially numbered with length 
markings using one or both of the methods given in6.1.1 and 6.1.2. The accuracy of 
length marking by these methods shall be such that the actual length of any cable 
section is never less than the length indicated by the marking. Unless otherwise 
specified by agreement between the manufacturer and the user, the accuracy of cable 
length marking shall be verified by measuring a length of the cable using the method in 
7.12. 

6.3.1 The marking shall be indented, embossed, or surface printed on the outer jacket. 
The characters shall be spaced at intervals not exceeding 24 in (610 mm) for 
products marked in feet, or not exceeding 1 m (40 in) for products marked in 



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metric units. The marking method used shall produce a clear, distinguishable, 
contrasting marking. 

6.3.2 The numbers shall be legible and durable. An occasional illegible marking is 
permissible if there is a legible marking located not more than 2 m for cables 
marked in meters, or 4 ft for cables marked in feet, from the illegible mark. 

6.3.3 The length markings shall not go through zero at any point. 

6.3.4 The marking shall meet print durability requirements in accordance with 7.5.2. 

6.4 CABLE REMARKING 

Cables may be remarked in accordance with the following: 

6.4.1 Defective marking may be removed and the cable remarked with the same color. 

6.4.2 Alternatively, the defective marking may remain and the cable may be re-marked 
using another contrasting color marking on a different portion of the 
circumference. This marking shall meet all of the original requirements. A tag 
shall be attached to both the outside of the cable and to the reel to indicate the 
correct print sequence. 

6.5 PACKAGING, PACKING, AND PACKAGE MARKING 

Completed optical fiber cable shall be packaged, packed, and marked as agreed upon 
by manufacturer and user. The following general provisions apply: 

6.5.1 Cable may be in coils, wound on reels, or supplied in other suitable 
configurations. 

6.5.2 Each package shall contain only one continuous length of cable. 

6.5.3 Coils and other non-reeled packaging configurations may be individually wrapped 
in protective wrappers, or packed in a carton. Packs shall be so constructed that 
the cable in the wrap or in the carton is appropriately protected during shipment 
and storage. The inner diameter of the coil shall be large enough to prevent 
damage to the cable during winding and unwinding (See 1.1.5). 

6.5.4 When cable is shipped on reels, the reels shall be constructed to prevent 
damage to the cable during shipment, storage, and installation. 

6.5.4.1 The diameter of the reel drum shall be large enough to prevent any damage 
to the cable during reeling or unreeling and shall be equal to or greater than 

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the minimum bending diameter of the cable (residual value, see 1.1.5) to be 
wound upon it. 

6.5.4.2 To protect cable on reels from damage during shipment, suitable protection 
shall be applied and secured to the reels. 

6.5.4.3 The inner and outer end of cable on reels shall be securely fastened to 
prevent the cable from coming loose in transit. If on-reel testing is required, 
there shall be agreement between the manufacturer and the user as to the 
length and configuration of the inner cable end. 

6.5.4.4 Each reel shall be marked to indicate the direction in which it should be rolled 
to prevent loosening of the cable on the reel. 

6.5.5 Each outer pack (carton or wrap) or reel shall be appropriately labeled with the 
manufacturer's identification, year of manufacturer, type of cable, number and 
size of fibers and/or conductors, and length of cable contained. Other 
information shall be included as agreed to by manufacturer and user. 

6.5.6 Each end of every length of cable shall be appropriately sealed to prevent the 
entrance of moisture. 



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PART 7 
TESTING, TEST METHODS, AND REQUIREMENTS 



7-1 TESTING 

All test methods described in Part 7 may not be applicable to each type of cable 
covered by this Standard, or to the applications in which they are used. Users and 
manufacturers should agree on which tests listed below are to be addressed. To 
determine which requirements may apply, refer to the appropriate Paragraphs of Parts 4 
through 6 and Part 8. 

Fiber optic cables produced in accordance with this Standard shall be tested by the 
manufacturer to determine compliance with the requirements of this Standard. When 
there is a conflict between the test methods provided in Part 7 and the publications of 
other organizations to which reference is made, the methods provided in Part 7 shall 
apply. 



7.2 EXTENT OF TESTING 

All tests specified in Part 7 shall be performed in accordance with 1.8. 

7.3 STANDARD TEST CONDITIONS 

7-3.1 Unless otherwise specified, testing shall be performed at the standard conditions 
defined in TIA/EIA-455 as follows: 

Condition Standard Ambient 

Temperature 23 + 5 *C 

Relative Humidity 20 to 70 % 

Atmospheric Pressure Site Ambient 

7.3.2 Standard Optical Test Wavelengths 

The standard optical test wavelengths for Part 7 are as follows, unless otherwise 
specified in the individual test: 

Fiber Type Wavelength 

Single-mode 1550 nm 

Multimode 1300 nm 

Specified changes in optical performance include an allowance for measurement 
repeatability. 

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7.4 ELECTRICAL TESTING OF CONDUCTIVE MATERIALS 

7.4.1 Electrical Testing of Communications Conductors 

When a composite cable is required, the applicable metallic conductor requirements 
shall be as established by agreement between the manufacturer and user. The 
requirements of ICEA S-84-608 should be considered when determining appropriate 
requirements. 

7.4.2 Electrical Testing of Other Conductive Elements 

Metallic cables, as described in 1.4.1.5, shall be tested for continuity in accordance with 
the test requirements for Continuity of Other Metallic Elements, as contained in 
ASTM D 4566. 



7.5 CONSTRUCTION, COLOR CODE, AND IDENTIFICATION 

7.5.1 Visual inspections shall be made to verify conformance to requirements for color 
coding of fibers, metallic conductors, fiber units, coverings, binders, identification 
markers, etc. 

7.5.2 Jacket Print Test 

7.5.2.1 Test Procedure 

Obtain a 1 -meter (3-foot) section of cable having print per sections 6.1 through 6.3 for 
testing. The print statement can be generic in nature or customized (unique). Lay the 
cable sample on a flat surface with the printing facing up. 

Secure a pad of 12 mm (0.5-in) thick "craft felt" (< 30% wool, with the rest rayon) to the 
flat surface of a weight of at least 450 g (1 lb). The flat surface shall be 25 mm X 
50mm(1 in X 2 in). 

Rest the felt-covered surface of the weight on the cable markings and slide back and 
forth for three complete cycles over the length of the sample print statement. All three 
cycles shall be completed within 5 to 10 seconds. 



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7.5.2.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The print statement, including length markings, shall remain discemable following the 
test. 



7.6 JACKET THICKNESS MEASUREMENTS 

7.6.1 Test Procedures 

Test for "Thickness" and "Eccentricity" in accordance with the relevant clauses of 
ASTM D 4565. The maximum jacket thickness and the jacket thickness diametrically 
opposite shall be used for the "Eccentricity" calculation. 

7.6.2 Acceptance Criteria 

Jacket "Thickness" and "Eccentricity" shall meet the requirements of 5.4,5. 

7.7 JACKET MATERIAL DENSITY MEASUREMENT 

7.7.1 Test Procedures 

Test per ASTM D 792 or ASTM D 1505, using a clean sample. 

7.7.2 Acceptance Criteria 

See Table 5.1 for requirements. 



7.8 JACKET TENSILE STRENGTH, YIELD STRENGTH, AND ULTIMATE 
ELONGATION TESTS 

7.8.1 Test Procedures 

Aged and unaged samples of jacketing material taken from finished cable shall be 
tested in accordance with FOTP-89. Alternatively, testing shall be in accordance with 
ASTM D 4565. Aged samples shall be conditioned at 100 ± 2°C (212 ± 3.6°F) for 120 
hours before testing. Jacket sample preparation shall be in accordance with Table 7-1 
and the following modification. Samples shall be cut longitudinally, but there shall be no 
metal seam, slitting cord, or strength member impressions within the gauge length. 

Jackets having embedded strength members or bonded sheaths shall be tested in 
accordance with FOTP-89. Either tubular or molded samples, per FOTP-89, may be 
used. Any jackets for which a uniform tubular section may be obtained from the cable 
sample shall be tested in tubular form, or a dumbbell sample cut from the tubular form, 
per FOTP-89. 

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When testing per ASTM D 4565, the tensile equipment setup in Table 7.1 shall be used. 

7.8.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The jacket shall meet the mechanical requirements of Table 5.1. 

Table 7.1 - Sample preparation and test set-up, jacket tensile properties 



Cable OD 
mm (in) 


Die 
ASTM D 638 <1) 


Equipment Jaw Separation 


Initial 
Distance 
mm (in) 


Separation Speed 
mm/min (in/min) (z> 


Routine 


Reference 


<38.0 
(<1.5) 


M-lll 
(V) 


25 + 5 
(1.0 ±0.2) 


100 ±25% 
(5 ± 25%) 


10 ±25% 
(0.5 ± 25%) 


>38.0 
(>1-5) 


M-ll 
(IV) 


80 ±5 
(2.5 ±0.2) 


500 ±10% 
(20 ±10%) 


50 ±10% 
(2 ±10%) 


Notes: 

1) ASTM D 638 now contains procedures for metric-based and US Customary- 
based test fixturing. Therefore, the dimensions herein are functional equivalents, 
corresponding to the type of equipment being used. 

2) In event of failure at routine high speed, retest at the slower or reference 
speed is permitted. 



7.9 JACKET MATERIAL ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT TEST 

7.9.1 Test Procedures 

Test per ASTM D 3349, using a clean sample. 

7.9.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The jacket shall meet the mechanical requirements of Table 5.1. 



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7.10 ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS CRACK RESISTANCE TEST 

7.10.1 Jacket Stress Crack Resistance (Large cables) 

This test applies to cable with an outside diameter of > 30 mm (1.2 in), per Table 5.1, 
footnote (5), and utilizes specimens of the cable outer jacket after removal from the 
cable. 

7.10.1.1 Test Procedures 

Test per the "Environmental Stress Crack (Polyolefin Jackets Only)" clause of 
ASTM D4565, using a clean sample [see Table 5-1 note (b)]. Use ASTM D 1693, 
Condition A for material types L1 and L2, and Condition B for material types M and H. 
Cut specimens shall be taken perpendicular to the cable axis. There shall be no metal 
seam impression in the cut specimens. 

7.10.1.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The jacket shall meet the requirements of Table 5.1. 

7.10.2 Jacket Stress Crack Resistance (Small cables) 

This test applies to cable with an outside diameter of < 30 mm (1.2 in), per Table 5.1, 
footnote (6), and utilizes a sample of the complete cable as the specimen. 

7.10.2.1 Test Procedures 

The test is performed on a specimen of finished cable of a length sufficient to perform 
the test. Select a mandrel with a diameter less than or equal to 10X the cable diameter. 
Bend the cable specimen in an arc of approximately 180 degrees around the mandrel. 
Remove the bent specimen from the mandrel and fix the ends to hold it in the bent 
configuration. Immerse the bent portion of the specimen into the stress crack reagent 
(same reagent as required by 7.10.1). Keep the bent specimen in the reagent at a 
temperature maintained at 50 ± 2 'C for a period of 48 hours. At the end of the 
immersion period, remove the specimen from the reagent bath and examine the jacket. 

7.10.2.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The jacket shall show no cracks or splits. The jacket shall meet the requirements of 
Table 5.1. 



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7.11 JACKET SHRINKAGE TEST 

The jacket shrinkage test measures the shrinkage or expansion of a cable jacket 
specimen due to temperature conditioning for a specified period of time. 

7.11.1 Test Procedure 

Cable jacket shrinkage measurements and data reporting shall be as required by 
FOTP-86. Remove all other cable components (strength members, armors, etc.) from 
the jacket samples before testing. 

As an alternative to FOTP-86, test per ASTM D 4565; with the exception that four 
specimens, 50 mm (2 in) long (parallel to the cable axis die cut longitudinally from the 
jacket) and 6 mm (0.25 in) wide, shall be die cut longitudinally from the jacket. One of 
the specimens shall be cut from a portion of the jacket lying directly over the outer 
shield overlap and the other three shall be taken at successive 90 degree increments to 
the overlap. 

7.11.2 Acceptance Criteria 

Samples of jacket removed from the completed cable shall meet the shrinkback 
requirement of Table 5. 1 . 



7.12 VERIFICATION OF CABLE LENGTH AND MARKING ACCURACY 

7.12.1 Test Procedure 

The length between printed length marks on a section of cable at least 3 meters (for 
cables marked in meters) or 10 feet (for cables marked in feet) in length shall be 
measured and compared with the length indicated by the printed markers. Calculate 
the difference between the actual measured length and the marker-indicated length (a 
measured length longer than the marker-indicated length is represented as a positive 
value). Divide this difference by the actual measured length to determine the 
percentage accuracy, plus or minus, of the marking. 

7.12.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The actual cable length shall be within 0% to +1% of the marked cable length. 



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7.13 CABLE AND COMPONENT DIMENSIONS 

7.13.1 Dimensions of Fibers 
7.13.1-1 Test Procedures 

Optical fiber measurements and data reporting shall be as required by FOTP-173. 

7.13.1.2 Acceptance Criteria 

Optical fiber requirements are listed in Part 2. 

7.13.2 Dimensions of Tight Buffered Fibers and Buffer Tubes 

7.13.2.1 Test Procedures 

Tight buffered fiber and buffer tube measurements and data reporting shall be 
conducted in accordance with FOTP-13 and using ASTM D 4565 for guidance on 
technique and calculations. 

7.13.2.2 Acceptance Criteria 

Buffer tube requirements are listed in 3.2. Tight buffer requirements are listed in 3.5. 

7.14 RIBBON DIMENSIONS 

7.14.1 Test Procedure 

Measure the agreed upon ribbon dimensions using FOTP-123. Any of the methods 
described in FOTP-123 may be used. 

7.14.2 Acceptance Criteria 

Important dimensions are shown in Figure 7,1. Ribbon dimensions shall not exceed 
those listed in Table 7.2. 



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Figure 7.1 - Ribbon dimensional parameters 



Ribbon Dimensions 

Ribbon width (w) 

Ribbon height (h) 

Fiber spacing, extreme fibers 

(b) 

Ribbon planarity (p) 




Table 7.2 - Maximum dimensions of optical fiber ribbons (urn) 



Number of 
Fibers (1) 


Ribbon 

Width 

(w) 


Ribbon 

Height 

(h) 


Fiber Alignment 


Extreme fibers 


Planarity 
<P> 


4 


1220 


360 


786 


50 


6 


1648 


360 


1310 


50 


8 


2172 


360 


1834 


50 


12 


3220 


360 


2882 


75 


24 


6800 


360 


Per 12 fiber unit 


Per 12 fiber unit 


Note 1) Dimensions for other ribbon fiber counts should be established between manufacturer and user. 



7.15 RIBBON TWIST TEST 

The ribbon twist test, or robustness test, evaluates the ability of the ribbon to resist 
splitting or other damage while undergoing dynamic twisting. The test cyclically twists 
the ribbon while under a specified load. 

7.15.1 Test Procedure 

7.15.1.1 Test the ribbon robustness using FOTP-141. 

7.15.1.2 The default test conditions of the FOTP apply and are as follows; 

Parameter Requirement 

Minimum number of cycles: 20 @ 10 to 20 cycles per minute 

Load: 500 + 25 g 

Rotation: 180 ± 10 degrees in each direction 

Ribbon gauge length: 300 ± 10 mm 

7.1 5.2 Acceptance Criteria 

There shall be no separation of individual fibers from the ribbon sample. 



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7.16 RIBBON RESIDUAL TWIST TEST 

The ribbon residual twist test, or flatness test, evaluates the degree of permanent twist 
in a cabled optical fiber ribbon. 

7.16.1 Test Procedure 

7.16.1.1 Test the ribbon residual twist in accordance with FOTP-131. 

7.16.1 .2 The default test conditions of the FOTP apply and are as follows: 

Parameter Requirement 

Ribbon gauge length: 50 + 5 cm 

Test load: 100±5g 

Preconditioning requirements: Age ribbon at 85 °C, uncontrolled 

relative humidity, for 30 days 

7.16.2 Acceptance Criteria 

There shall be no more than 8 degrees of residual twist per linear centimeter exhibited 
by the ribbon sample. 

7.17 RIBBON SEPARABILITY TEST 

The ribbon separability test ensures the ability to separate fibers, or groups of fibers 
from a ribbon. 

7.17.1 Test Procedure 

7.17.1.1 Obtain a ribbon fiber sample with a minimum length of 300 mm. 

7.17.1.2 The test for separability is to be performed for the number of fibers to be 
separated from the ribbon in accordance with the Detail Specification. 

7.17.1.3 A starting separation length of > 50 mm is achieved with a knife, or other 
appropriate method, in accordance with Figure 7.2. Separation shall be 
accomplished without specialized tools or apparatus. 

7.17.1.4 Each specimen is separated by hand as shown in Figure 7.3. The separation 
speed shall be approximately 500 mm/min. 



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7.17.2 Acceptance Criteria 

Separation shall be readily accomplished by hand. After separation, there shall be no 
mechanical damage to the fibers and the color of the fibers shall still be discernible. 



Figure 7.2 - Ribbon preparation 



Starting separation > 50 mm 
length 



Tear length 



> 250 mm 




> 300 mm 



Note: Tear length (Figure 7-2) as shown. 



Figure 7.3 - Ribbon separation 



s\ 




^ 



7.18 RIPCORD FUNCTIONAL TEST 

This test ensures ability of ripcords, when used, to perform in a reliable manner. 

7.18.1 Test Procedure 

Prepare the specimen to be tested in accordance with the manufacturers recommended 
procedures. An appropriate length of the end of the cable specimen should be 
prepared such that the rip cords are accessible for the test. To prevent the ripcord from 
slipping out of the end of the test sample, use a suitable length of cable or other method 
to securely couple the ripcord(s) to the other cable materials. Mark off the one meter 
test length from where the test pull will begin. 

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The cable shall be conditioned for four hours at the low and high installation 
temperatures given in Clause 1.1. The cable specimens shall be tested inside the 
chamber at the low and high installation temperatures 

Pull the ripcord in accordance with the manufacturers recommended procedures for a 
distance of one meter. 

7.18.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The ripcord(s) shall not break over the test length. 

If the ripcord breaks prior to reaching the one-meter mark, two additional follow-up 
specimens may be tested from the same cable length. The cable passes if neither of 
the two follow-up specimens breaks prior to reaching the one-meter mark. 

If the ripcord pulls out of the end of the cable without slitting the jacket, repeat the test. 



7.19 MATERIAL COMPATIBILITY AND CABLE AGING TEST 

This test ensures compatibility between cable components (e.g., fibers, plastics, water 
blocking materials, metals, etc.). This test applies to all water-blocked cables. Typical 
water-blocking materials include but are not limited to, gels, absorbent powders, and 
flooding compounds. 

7.19.1 Test Procedure 

Sufficient lengths of completed cable shall be aged at 85DC, uncontrolled relative 
humidity, for 30 days. The cable ends shall be capped to prevent the migration of 
water-blocking material out of the cable. 

To simulate aging in a flooded cable, filled buffer tubes may alternatively be placed in 
the water-blocking material. Jacket, and metal tapes, can also be aged per ASTM D 
4568. 

After aging, the components shall be removed from the cable and tested as described in 
the applicable Paragraphs. 

7.19.2 Acceptance Criteria 

After conditioning, the components in contact with the water-blocking material shall be 
removed from the cable and tested per 7.19.2.1 - 7.19.2.4 as appropriate. 



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7.19.2.1 Fiber Strippability 

FOTP-178 shall be used for measuring the strip force needed to remove the optical 
fiber's protective coating or coating and buffer. 

The coating of the fibers shall not show any signs of cracking, splitting, or delamination, 
when examined under 5X magnification. The force required to remove 30 D 3 mm of 
the fiber's protective coating shall be between 1.0 N and 9.0 N. 

For tight buffer fibers, the force required to strip the buffer material and the fiber coating 
of a 15 + 1.5 mm specimen, in a single operation, shall be between 1 .3 N and 13.3 N. 

The strippability of optical fiber ribbons after aging shall meet the requirements of 
3.4.4.6. 

7.19.2.2 Buffer Tube Bending Test 

Select a mandrel having a diameter that is the larger of 75 mm (3 inches), or 20X the 
tube diameter. 

Samples of the aged buffer tubes shall be wrapped three times (within 30 seconds) 
around the mandrel, removed, and then straightened. The buffer tube shall not show 
signs of splitting, cracking, or delamination under 5X magnification. 

7.19.2.3 Jacket Tensile Strength and Elongation Test 

The aged jacket shall retain a minimum of 85 % of its unaged tensile strength and 
elongation values. Jacket material tensile and elongation shall be tested in accordance 
withFOTP-89. 

7.19.2.4 Delamination 

Plastic coatings on metal tapes shall show no evidence of delamination. 



7.20 TIGHT BUFFER STRIPPABILITY TEST 

The tight buffer strippability test measures the force required to strip the buffer material 
and the fiber coating. 

7.20.1 Test Procedure 

Test tight buffer strippability in accordance with FOTP-1 78. 



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7.20.2 Acceptance Criteria 



The force required to strip the buffer material and the fiber coating of a 15 + 1.5 mm 
specimen, in a single operation, shall be between 1.3 N and 13.3 N. 



7.21 CABLE LOW AND HIGH TEMPERATURE BEND TEST 

The low and high temperature bend test determines the ability of an optical fiber cable 
to withstand bending at low and high temperatures as might be encountered during 
installation. 

7.21.1 Test Procedure 

Test in accordance with FOTP-37. The low temperature bend test shall be conducted 
at -30°C (Condition E) while the high temperature bend test shall be conducted at 60°C 

(Condition N). 

Test Method I or II can be used. The number of turns around the mandrel shall be 4. 

The mandrel diameters used shall be 20X the cable outer diameter. 

For cables not having a circular cross-section, bending requirements are to be 
determined using the thickness (minor axis) as the cable diameter and bending in the 
direction of the preferential bend. 

7.21 .2 Acceptance Criteria 

There shall be no visible cracks, splits, tears, or other openings on either the inner or 
outer surface of the jacket. 

There shall be no visible cracking of the sheath components when removed 
successively and examined. 

There shall be no broken fibers within the specimen. 

Any increase in attenuation shall be: 

• < 0.15 dB at 1550 nm for single-mode fibers 

• < 0.30 dB at 1300 nm for multimode fibers 



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7.22 CABLE EXTERNAL FREEZING TEST 

This test determines the ability of a cable to withstand the effects of freezing water (ice) 
that may immediately surround the optical fiber cable jacket by observing any changes 
in the physical appearance of the jacket, or in the measured cable optical attenuation. 

7.22.1 Test Procedure 

Cable freezing test measurements and data reporting shall be as required by FOTP-98 
Method A using the Temperature Exposure Procedure. 

7.22.2 Acceptance Criteria 

There shall be no visible cracks or other openings on the outer surface of the jacket. 

Any increase in attenuation shall be: 

• < 0.15 dB at 1550 nm for single-mode fibers 

• <0.30dBat 1300 nm for multimode fibers 



7.23 COMPOUND FLOW (DRIP) TEST FOR FILLED CABLE 

The compound flow test measures the ability of the cable filling and flooding compounds 
to resist flowing at an elevated temperature. This test does not apply to cables that are 
free of gels, and which achieve water-blocking by the use of dry tapes, yarns, powders 
and the like. 

7.23.1 Test Procedure 

Compound flow test measurements and data reporting shall be as required by 
FOTP-81, with preconditioning of specimens permitted. Testing shall be conducted at a 
temperature of 70 ± 2 °C for 24 hours. The cable samples prepared end may be 
terminated according to the manufacture's recommended installation instructions. The 
upper (unprepared) end of the cable or buffer tube may be sealed to simulate long 
length cable sections. 

7.23.2 Acceptance Criteria 

There shall be < 0.05 grams of material drip from the cable sample under test. 



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7,24 CABLE TEMPERATURE CYCLING TEST 

The cable temperature cycling test evaluates the attenuation performance of an optical 
fiber cable at temperature extremes. Because the thermal expansion coefficient and 
rigidity moduli of plastic coatings, buffers, armors, and strength members are different 
from those for the optical fibers themselves, fiber bend effects can occur with 
temperature changes. 

7.24.1 Test Procedure 

Cable temperature cycling, measurements and data reporting shall be as required by 
FOTP-3. The cable shall be tested at the environmental extremes of -40°C and +70°C. 
The test shall be conducted for two complete cycles. Attenuation measurements shall be 
made after preconditioning and again after the end of the last high and the last low 
temperature points of the test. 

7.24.2 Acceptance Criteria 

Any increase in attenuation shall be: 

• < 0.15 dB/km at 1550 nm for single-mode fibers 

• < 0.30 dB/km at 1 300 nm for multimode fibers 



7.25 HYDROGEN EVOLUTION IN CABLE 

Reactive and non-reactive hydrogen effects target specific optical wavelengths and, 
depending on temperatures and partial pressures, can become severe enough to effect 
transmission properties in extreme cases. This test is only appropriate for cables 
containing single-mode fibers continuously submerged underwater at depths 
> 10 meters, or for cable constructions which are hermetically sealed. Testing terrestrial 
outside plant cables for the effects of molecular hydrogen migration is generally not 
required, as hydrogen will not accumulate in sufficient quantities to cause elevated 
attenuation levels. 

Some older generation optical fibers may be susceptible to the effects of molecular 
hydrogen, however hydrogen effects are primarily associated with submarine optical 
fiber cables. For submarine cables, additional metallic components are required to 
provide the necessary protection and negative buoyancy for the cable. The large 
quantity of metallic components and the corrosive water environment nurtures hydrogen 
generation. Additionally, backpressure caused by the water allows a greater partial 
pressure of hydrogen gas to accumulate. 



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7.25.1 Test Procedure 

Hydrogen evolution in cable measurements and data reporting shall be as required by 
FOTP-183. 

7.25.2 Acceptance Criteria 

For single-mode fibers, the increase in attenuation shall be as agreed upon by the 
manufacturer and user 



7.26 CABLE SHEATH ADHERENCE TEST 

The cable sheath adherence test measures the resistance of the cable sheath 
components (shield or armor and the overlaying jacket) to separation, one from another, 
by measuring the force required to pull the cable core and metallic covering out of the 
jacket. 

7.26.1 Test Procedure 

Cable sheath adherence measurements and data reporting shall be as required by 
ASTM D 4565 at 23 ± 5°C. 

The requirement is specified in force/unit circumference, and the circumference 
measurement shall be made over the metallic tape. 

7.26.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The minimum sheath adherence shall be 14 N/mm (80 Ibf/in) for shielded or armored 
cables. 



7.27 CYCLIC FLEXING TEST 

The cyclic flexing test for cable measures the ability of a cable to withstand flexure 
through a 180° arc for a prescribed number of cycles. It is used to evaluate the ability of 
the cable to survive flexing as may be encountered during installation efforts. 

7.27.1 Test Procedure 

Test in accordance with the requirements of FOTP-104, using Procedures I and IV. The 
mandrel diameter used shall be the larger of 20X cable diameter or 150 mm. The test 
shall be repeated for a total of 25 cycles. Measure or monitor the transmitted optical 
power or attenuation of selected fibers. 



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7.27.2 Acceptance Criteria 

There shall be no visible cracks, splits, tears, or other openings on either the inner or 
outer surface of the jacket. 

There shall be no visible cracking of the armor or shielding greater than 5 mm in length. 

Any increase in attenuation shall be; 

• < 0.15 dB at 1550 nm for single-mode fibers 

• < 0.30 dB at 1300 nm for multimode fibers 



7.28 WATER PENETRATION TEST 

The water penetration test measures the degree to which water may penetrate a 
specimen of cable that is subjected to a specified water head for a specified period of 
time. 

7.28.1 Test Procedure 

Water penetration measurements and data reporting shall be as required by FOTP-82 
(e.g. 1 m of water head and 1 m sample length). Test with tap water. Sodium 
Fluorescein dyes may be added at the option of the testing laboratory. The test period 
shall be 24 hours. Retest per FOTP-82, as required. 

7.28.2 Acceptance Criteria 

There shall be no evidence of fluid leaking from the exposed end of the cable sample 
under test. 



7.29 CABLE IMPACT TEST 

The impact test measures the optical transmission and mechanical changes that may 
occur when the cable, at room temperature, is subjected to an impact perpendicular to 
its surface. It is used to evaluate the ability of the cable to survive impact forces as may 
be encountered during installation efforts or during shipping or handling, 

7.29.1 Test Procedure 

Test in accordance with the requirements of FOTP-25. 



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7.29.2 Acceptance Criteria 

There shall be no visible cracks, splits, tears, or other openings on the outer surface of 
the jacket. 

There shall be no broken fibers within the specimen. 

Any increase in attenuation shall be: 

• < 0.15 dB at 1550 nm for single-mode fibers 

• < 0.30 dB at 1300 nm for multimode fibers 



7.30 CABLE TENSILE LOADING AND FIBER STRAIN TEST 

The optical fiber cable tensile loading and bending test measures the optical 
transmission and mechanical changes that may occur due to tensile loading combined 
with bending of the cable, primarily as a result of installation related forces. This test 
evaluates both the strength members and the susceptibility of the fibers to stress due to 
such forces. The construction and dimensions of the cable, especially the strength 
member(s), affect the cable's resistance to performance degradation or mechanical 
damage due to tensile loading and bending forces related to installation. 

For aerial self-supporting cables the requirements of this test do not generally apply as 
the most restrictive forces are due to post-installation loading of the cable resulting from 
local environmental conditions (e.g., ice and wind). For cables intended for aerial self- 
supporting applications, users should refer to Annex D for additional considerations. 

For the purposes of this Standard the requirements of this Section do not apply to aerial 
self-supporting cables, unless otherwise agreed upon between the manufacturer and 
user. 

7.30.1 Test Procedure 

Tensile Loading and Bending measurements and data reporting shall be as required by 
FOTP-33. The fiber strain test may be performed as part of the tensile load and bend 
test. Fiber strain measurements and data reporting shall be made as required by 
FOTP-38. 

• Test Condition I is prior to the application of the load. 

• Test Condition II is with the cable under the tensile loading: 



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Installation Method 
Standard 
Standard lower 
Aerial Self-Supporting 



Rated Installation Load 
2670 N (600 Ibf) 
1330 N (300 lbf) (1) 
As agreed upon between 
manufacturer and user 



Note 1 - As agreed upon between manufacturer and user for a particular 
application. 

Residual Load 

30 % of the rated installation load for all except aerial self-supporting 

• Test Condition III is with the load removed. 

HoLl able w n0t h r' ir ll f drCUlar cross - secti °n, bending requirements are to be 
determined using the thickness (minor axis) as the cable diameter and bending in the 
direction of the preferential bend. ■«»■«'» ine 



The steps of the test procedure shall be as follows: 



1. Measure the optical power transmission at Test Condition I This is the 
baseline measurement from which all attenuation increases are 
calculated. 

2 " l e ?ll° n J« e Cab,e t0 the Rated 'nstallation Load (Test Condition II) and 
hold for 60 minutes. 

3. Measure the fiber strain per FOTP-38, while the cable is held at the Rated 
Installation Load. 

4. Reduce the tension to the Residual Load level (Test Condition II) and hold 
for 10 minutes. 

5. Measure the optical power transmission per FOTP-33 while the cable is 
held at the Residual Load. 

6. Measure the fiber strain per FOTP-38, while the cable is held at the 
Residual Load. 

7. Remove the load (Test Condition III), and allow the cable to relax for 
5 minutes. 

8. Measure the optical power transmission per FOTP-33. 



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7.30.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The axial fiber strain shall be < 60 % of the fiber proof level while the cable is under the 
Rated Installation Load. 

The axial fiber strain shall be < 20 % of the fiber proof level while the cable is under the 
Residual Load. 

Any increase in attenuation at the Residual Load or after load removal shall be: 

• < 0.15 dB at 1550 nm for single-mode fibers 

• < 0.30 dB at 1300 nm for multimode fibers 



7.31 CABLE COMPRESSIVE LOADING TEST 

The compressive loading test measures the optical transmission and mechanical 
changes that may occur when the cable is subjected to compressive loading 
perpendicular to the axis of the cable. This test evaluates the ability of the cable 
construction to isolate the optical fibers from external compressive forces. The 
construction and dimensions of the cable affects the resistance of the cable to 
performance degradation due to compressive loading. 

7.31.1 Test Procedure 

The compressive loading test measurements and data reporting shall be as required by 
FOTP-41. The load to be applied shall be 220 N/cm (125 lb/in) at a rate of 2.5 mm 
(0.1 in) per minute and maintained for a period of 1 minute. The load shall then be 
decreased to 1 10 N/cm (63 lb/in). 

Alternately, it is acceptable to remove the 220 N/cm (125 lb/in) entirely and apply the 
110 N/cm (63 lb/in) load within 5 minutes at a rate of 2.5 mm (0.1 in) per minute. 

The 110 N/cm (63-lb/in) load shall be maintained for a period of 10 minutes. 

Attenuation measurements shall be performed at 110 N before release of the load. 

7.31 .2 Acceptance Criteria 

Any increase in attenuation shall be: 

• < 0.15 dB at 1550 nm for single-mode fibers 

• < 0.30 dB at 1300 nm for multimode fibers 



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7.32 CABLE TWIST TEST 

This test evaluates the ability of the cable to limit optical transmission losses and 
mechanical changes that may occur due to twisting from handling and installation. The 
cable construction and the manner of cable manufacturing may affect the cable 
performance degradation due to such twisting. 

7.32.1 Test Procedure 

Cable twist test measurements and data reporting shall be as required by FOTP-85. 
The length of the cable sample under test shall be no more than 2.0 meters. The test 
shall be repeated for 10 cycles. 

7.32.2 Acceptance Criteria 

There shall be no visible cracks, splits, tears, or other openings on the outer surface of 
the jacket. 

Any increase in attenuation shall be: 

• < 0.15 dB at 1550 nm for single-mode fibers 

• < 0.30 dB at 1 300 nm for multimode fibers 



7.33 CABLE LIGHTNING DAMAGE SUSCEPTIBILITY TEST 

The lightning damage susceptibility test is used to measure the ability of an optical fiber 
cable structure to protect optical fibers from the effects of a lightning strike at or near the 
cable. This test evaluates the physical damage that may occur to cable designs 
containing metallic elements by simulating a lightning strike using an electric arc 
discharge to a cable specimen buried in wet sand. 

The frequency and severity of lightning strikes varies considerably from one geographic 
area to another. The energy delivered to a cable also varies in each case, so the 
degree of lightning protection needed will not be the same for all installations. 

This test is not used for figure-8 self-supporting cables which utilize a metallic 
messenger. These messengers are typically well-grounded and have current 
capabilities far in excess of that intended for FOTP-181 . 

7.33.1 Test Procedure 

Unless otherwise specified, FOTP-181 shall be used. 



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7.33.2 Acceptance Criteria 

There shall be no loss of optical continuity at the rating category specified in the 
Detailed Specification. Cables may be classified based on the peak value of the current 
pulse at which fiber continuity is maintained. 



Category 

1 
2 

3 
4 



Test Current Level (kA) 
105 
80 
55 

< 55 or not rated 



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ANSI/ICEA S-87-640-2006 

PART 8 
FINISHED CABLE OPTICAL PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS 

8.1 OPTICAL PERFORMANCE 

The optical performance values in Table 8.1 through Table 8.3 are routinely specified in 
the Detail Specification. When these values are not specified, a finished cable shall 
conform to the minimum performance requirements of Table 8.1 through Table 8.3. 

Table 8.1 - Attenuation coefficient performance requirements (dB/km) 



Fiber Type 


Maximum Attenuation 


Multimode (50/125 \un) - AH 


3.5/1.0 @ 850/1300 nm 


Multimode (62.5/125 urn) 


3.5/1.0® 850/1300 nm 


Single-mode (Class IVa) 


0.4/0.3 @ 1310/1550 nm ll) 


NZDS Single-mode (Class IVd) 


0.3 @ 1550 nm (2) 


Notes: 

1) The attenuation coefficient for Class IVa fibers may also be specified at 1 383 nm and 1625 
nm as agreed upon between manufacturer and end-user. 

2) The attenuation coefficient for Class IVd fibers may also be specified at 1625 nm as 
agreed upon between manufacturer and end-user. 



Table 8.2 - Multimode bandwidth coefficient performance requirements (MHz*km) 



Source 
Conditions 


Minimum Modal Bandwidth 


50/125 


62.5/125 


492AAAB 


492AAAC 


OFL 850nm 
1300 nm 

EMB 850 nm 


500 
500 

NA 


1500 
500 

2000 


160 
500 

NA 



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Table 8.3 - Point discontinuity acceptance criteria (dB) 



Fiber Type 


Maximum Attenuation at Specified 
Operating Wavelengths 


Multimode (all) 


0.2 W 


Single-mode (Class IVa) 


0.1 w 


Single-mode (Class IVd) 


0.1 < 3 ' 


Notes: 

1) The operational wavelengths for Multimode fibers are 850 and 1300 nm 

2) The operational wavelengths for Class IVa fibers are 1310 and 1550 nm, but may also 
include 1383 nm and 1625 nm as agreed upon between manufacturer and end-user. 

3) The operational wavelengths for Class IVd fibers is 1550 nm, but may also include 
1625 nm as agreed upon between manufacturer and end-user. 



8.2 ATTENUATION COEFFICIENT 

Attenuation coefficient (sometimes referred to as attenuation rate), a (A,), is defined as 
the diminution of optical power at wavelength X, and is usually expressed as dB per unit 
length. The equation is: 



cc{X) 



-10 

L 



log. 



P,(A) 



Where: P B {X) is the output power of the test fiber at wavelength X at point B, P A (X) is 
the input power to the test fiber at wavelength X at point A, and L is the length of fiber 
between point A and point B. 

8.2.1 Test Procedure 

Unless otherwise agreed upon, optical attenuation measurement methods shall be as 
shown in Table 8.4. 



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Table 8.4 - Optical attenuation measurement methods 



Fibers 


Measurement Method 


Multimode, Graded 
Index only 


FOTP-78 


Single-mode, 
Dispersion Unshifted 


FOTP-78 


Single-mode only, 
Non-zero Dispersion-shifted 


FOTP-78 



8.2.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The maximum attenuation performance values at specific wavelengths shall be as 
specified in Table 8.1. 



8.3 MULTIMODE OPTICAL BANDWIDTH 

The modal bandwidth of a multimode fiber may be specified with overfilled launch (OFL) 
or restricted mode launch (RML) conditions, however RML bandwidths are not 
requirements of this standard. It may also be specified as Effective Modal Bandwidth 
(EMB) using Differential Mode Delay (DMD) templates or EMB-calculated (EMBc) for 
applications which employ laser sources and laser-optimized fibers supporting serial 
high data rate applications (e.g., 10 Gigabit Ethernet or 10 Gigabit Fibrechannel). 

8.3.1 Test Procedure 

Modal bandwidth of multimode fibers shall be measured using the test procedures 
shown in Table 8.5. 

Table 8.5 - Multimode optical bandwidth measurement methods 



Source 
Conditions 


Test Procedure 


OFL 


FOTP-204 


RML 


FOTP-204 


EMB 


FOTP-220 



When the results are reported as pulse spreading per unit length (in ns/km), the method 
of normalization to unit length shall be reported. Use light launch conditions as required 



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by FOTP-204. Unless otherwise specified use FOTP-57 for guidelines in fiber end 
preparation. 

8.3.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The bandwidth shall be greater than or equal to the values specified by the Detail 
Specification or Table 8.2. 



8.4 OPTICAL POINT DISCONTINUITIES 

A point discontinuity is a localized deviation of the optical fiber loss characteristic. The 
location and magnitude of such point discontinuities along an optical fiber cable may be 
determined by appropriate OTDR measurements. 

8.4.1 Test Procedure 

Point discontinuity measurements shall be as required by FOTP-78. 

8.4.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The maximum values at specific wavelengths shall be as specified in Table 8.3. 

8.5 CABLE CUTOFF WAVELENGTH (Single-Mode Fibers Only) 

The cutoff wavelength of an optical fiber in a cable (Ace) is the shortest wavelength that 
will support propagation of only one mode in a cabled fiber. Operation below this 
wavelength may allow multimode propagation, which can substantially decrease the 
information carrying capacity. 

8.£.1 Test Procedure 

FOTP-80 shall be used. The method for reporting test results shall be in accordance 
with that described in the FOTP. A mapping function relating fiber cutoff wavelength as 
measured in accordance with FOTP-80, and cabled cutoff wavelength may be used to 
comply with the requirements of this clause. The manufacturer shall demonstrate the 
validity of the mapping function. 

8.5.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The maximum cutoff wavelength for optical cable shall be: 

• <1260 nm for single-mode fibers specified to operate at 1310 nm (i.e. Class IVa) 

• <1480 nm for single-mode fibers specified to operate only at 1550 nm or higher 

(i.e. Class IVd) 



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8.6 POLARIZATION MODE DISPERSION (Single-Mode Fibers Only) 

8.6.1 Test Procedure 

Cabled fiber polarization mode dispersion (PMD) shall be calculated on a statistical 
basis, not on an individual fiber basis. Measurements on individual cabled fibers may 
be performed in accordance with FOTP-113, FOTP-122, or FOTP-124. The root mean 
square of the cabled fiber PMD measurements may be used to predict the performance 
of the optical fiber cable link or to demonstrate the compliance of a cable design. 

8.6.2 Acceptance Criteria 

The calculated link PMD should not exceed 0.5 ps/Vkm. This corresponds to a PMD 
limited transmission distance (1 dB penalty) of approximately 400 km for digital 0O192 
(10 Gbps) systems. 

This value of PMD is also acceptable for most amplitude modulated systems. Systems 
with lower bit rate-distance products can tolerate higher values of PMD without 
impairment, while higher bit rate-distance products would require a lower maximum for 
the PMD coefficient 

The performance prediction methodology used shall be in accordance with TIA-559 
unless otherwise agreed upon between manufacturer and user. 



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PART 9 
REFERENCES 



STANDARDS AND SPECIFICATIONS 

Though these documents go through a periodic review and may be simply reaffirmed 
without change, the reaffirmation dates are not shown. The dates shown indicate the 
effective date of the current revision. When a publication date is not indicated, the 
document is still in the review/revision/ballot cycle as of the date of this Standard. The 
published version shall be used when next published. Some rescinded documents are 
included for reference. Where shown, a statement indicating that the document has been 
rescinded is included. 



SPECIFICATION 
AND ISSUE DATE 

ANSI/ASQ 9000-1 - 94 
ASTMA167-99 
ASTM A 176 -99 
ASTMA308/A308M-06 
ASTM A 370 - 06 



ASTM A 623/A 623M 
REVA-06 

ASTM A 624/A 624M - 03 



ASTM A 625/A 625M - 03 



TITLE 

Quality Management and Quality Assurance Standards - 
Guidelines for Selection and Use 

Standard Specification for Stainless and Heat - Resisting 
Chromium - Nickel Steel Plate, Sheet, and Strip 

Standard Specification for Stainless and Heat - Resisting 
Chromium Steel Plate, Sheet, and Strip 

Standard Specification for Steel Sheet, Terne (Lead-Tin Alloy) 
Coated by the Hot-Dip Process 

Standard Test Methods and Definitions for Mechanical 
Testing of Steel Products 

Standard Specification for Tin Mill Products, General 
Requirements 

Standard Specification for Tin Mill Products, Electrolytic Tin 
Plate, Single - Reduced 

Standard Specification for Tin Mill Products, Black Plate, 
Single - Reduced 



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SPECIFICATION 
AND ISSUE DATE 



TITLE 



ASTM A 641 /A 641 M - 03 Standard Specification for Zinc-Coated (Galvanized) Carbon 

Steel Wire 



ASTM A 657/A 657M 
ASTM B 694 -03 

ASTM B 736 -00 

ASTM D 638 - 03 
ASTM D 792 -00 

ASTM D 1248-04 

ASTM D 1505-03 

ASTM D 1603-06 
ASTM D 1693-05 

ASTM D 3349 -06 

ASTM D 4565 -99 

ASTM D 4566 -05 

ASTM D 4568 -99 



03 Standard Specification for Tin Mill Products, Black Plate 
Electrolytic Chromium-Coated, Single and Double Reduced 

Standard Specification for Copper, Copper-Alloy, and 
Copper-Clad Stainless Steel (CCS), and Copper-Clad Alloy 
Steel (CAS) Sheet and Strip for Electrical Cable Shielding 

Standard Specification for Aluminum, Aluminum Alloy, and 
Aluminum-Clad Steel Cable Shielding Stock 

Standard Test Methods for Tensile Properties of Plastics 

Standard Test Methods for Density and Specific Gravity 
(Relative Density) of Plastics by Displacement 

Standard Specification for Polyethylene Plastics Molding and 
Extrusion Materials 

Standard Test Method for Density of Plastics by the Density- 
Gradient Technique 

Standard Test Method for Carbon Black in Olefin Plastics 

Standard Test Method for Environmental Stress-Cracking of 
Ethylene Plastics 

Standard Test Method for Absorption Coefficient of Ethylene 
Polymer Material Pigmented with Carbon Black 

Standard Test Methods for Physical and Environmental 
Performance Properties of Insulations and Jackets for 
Telecommunications Wire and Cable 

Standard Test Methods for Electrical Performance Properties 
of Insulations and Jackets for Telecommunications Wire and 
Cable 

Standard Test Methods for Evaluating Compatibility Between 
Cable Filling and Flooding Compounds and Polyolefin Wire 
and Cable Materials 



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SPECIFICATION 
AND ISSUE DATE 

ASTM E 29 REV B - 06 



ISO 9001 -00 
TIA^40-B, 2004 
TIA/EIA-455-B, 1998 

TIA/EIA-455-3A, 1989 

TIA455-13A, 1996 

TIA/EIA-455-25C, 2002 

TIA/EIA-455-33B, 2005 
TIA/EIA-455-37A.1993 
TIA-455-38, 1995 
TIA/EIA -455-41 A, 1993 
TIA-455-50B, 1998 

TIA/EIA-455-57B, 1996 



TIA-455-78B, 2002 
(IEC 60793-1^10) 

TIA-455-80C, 2003 
(IEC 60793-1-44) 



ANSI/ICEA S-87-640-2006 



TITLE 

Standard Practice for Using Significant Digits in Test Data 
to Determine Conformance With Specifications 

Quality Management Systems Requirements 

Fiber Optic Terminology 

Standard Test Procedures for Fiber Optic Fibers, Cables, 
Transducers, Sensors, Connecting and Terminating 
Devices, and Other Fiber Optic Components 

Procedure to Measure Temperature Cycling Effects on 
Optical Fibers, Optical Cable, and Other Passive Fiber 
Optic Components 

Visual and Mechanical Inspection of Fiber Optic 
Components, Devices, and Assemblies 

Repeated Impact Testing of Fiber Optic Cable and Cable 
Assemblies 

Fiber Optic Cable Tensile Loading and Bending Test 

Low or High Temperature Bend Test for Fiber Optic Cable 

Measurement of Fiber Strain in Cables Under Tensile Load 

Compressive Loading Resistance of Fiber Optic Cables 

Light Launch Conditions for Long-Length Graded Index 
Optical Fiber Spectral Attenuation Measurements 

Preparation and Examination of Optical Fiber Endface for 
Testing Purposes 

FOTP-78 IEC 60793-1-40 Optical Fibres - PART 1-40: 
Measurement Methods and Test Procedures - Attenuation 

FOTP-80 IEC 60793-1-44 Optical Fibres - PART 1-44: 
Measurement Methods and Test Procedures -Cut-off 
Wavelength 



TIA/EIA -455-81 B, 2000 Compound Flow (Drip) Test for Filled Fiber Optic Cable 



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SPECIFICATION 
AND ISSUE DATE 

TIA-455-82B, 1992 
TIA/EIA-455-85A, 1992 
EIA RS-455-86, 1983 
TIA-455-89B, 1998 
TIA-455-98A, 1990 
TIA/EIA-455-104A, 1993 
TIA/EIA-455-113, 1997 

TIA-455-122A.2002 

TIA/EIA-455-123, 2000 
TIA^55-124A,2004 

TIA/EIA-455-131,1997 
TIA/EIA-455-141, 1999 
TIA/EIA-455-173, 1990 



TIA/EIA-455-178B, 2003 
(IEC 60793-1-32) 



TIA/EIA-455-181,1993 

TIA/EIA-455-183, 2000 
TIA-472C00O-B, 2005 



TITLE 

Fluid Penetration Test for Fluid-Blocked Fiber Optic Cable 

Fiber Optic Cable Twist Test 

Fiber Optic Cable Jacket Shrinkage 

Fiber Optic Cable Jacket Elongation and Tensile Strength 

Fiber Optic Cable External Freezing Test 

Fiber Optic Cable Cyclic Flexing Test 

Polarization-Mode Dispersion measurement for Single- 
Mode Optical Fibers by the Fixed Analyzer Method 

Polarization-Mode Dispersion Measurement for Single- 
Mode Optical Fibers by Stokes Parameter Evaluation 

Measurement of Optical Fiber Ribbon Dimensions 

Polarization-Mode Dispersion Measurement for Single- 
Mode Optical Fibers by Interferometric Method 

Measurement of Optical Fiber Ribbon Residual Twist 

Twist Test for Optical Fiber Ribbons 

Coating Geometry Measurement For Optical Fiber Side 
View Method 

FOTP-178 IEC 60793-1-32 Optical Fibres - PART 1-32: 
Measurement Methods and Test Procedures - Coating 
Strippability 

Lightning Damage Susceptibility Test For Fiber Optic 
Cables With Metallic Components 

Fiber Optic Cable Hydrogen Evolution Test 

Standard for Optical Fiber Premises Distribution Cable 
(Adoption of ICEA S-83-596-2001 ) 



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SPECIFICATION 
AND ISSUE DATE 

TIA-472E000, 2005 



TIA-472F000, 2005 

TIA^920000-B, 1997 
TIA^92A000-A, 1997 

TIA-492AA00-A, 1998 

TIA-492AAAA-A, 1998 

TIA^92AAAB, 1998 

TIA-492AAAC-A, 2003 



TIA/EIA-492BB00, 1989 
(Withdrawn) 



TIA-492C000, 1998 
TIA^92CA00, 1998 
TIA-492CAAA, 1998 
TIA-492CAAB, 2000 



TITLE 

Standard for Indoor-Outdoor Optical Fiber Cable (Adoption 
of ICEAS-1 04-696-2001) 

Standard for Optical Fiber Drop Cable (Adoption of ICEA S- 
110-717-2003) 

Generic Specification for Optical Fibers 

Sectional Specification for Class la Graded-lndex 

Multimode Optical Fibers 

Blank Detail Specification for Class la Graded-lndex 
Multimode Optical Fibers 

Detail Specification for 62.5 Mm Core Diameter/125 pm 
Cladding Diameter Class la Graded-lndex Multimode 
Optical Fibers 

Detail Specification for 50 w m Core Diameter/125 h m 
Cladding Diameter Class 1a Graded Index Multimode 
Optical Fibers 

Detail Specification for 850-nm Laser-Optimized, 50-um 
Core Diameter/1 25-um Cladding Diameter Class la 
Graded-lndex Multimode Optical 

Blank Detail Specification for Class IVb Dispersion - Shifted 
Single-Mode Optical Waveguide Fibers (withdrawn August, 
2002) (This document has been withdrawn and is included 
for historical reference.) 

Sectional Specification for Class IVa Dispersion-Unshifted 
Single-Mode Optical Fibers 

Blank Detail Specification for Class IVa Dispersion- 
Unshifted Single-Mode Optical Fibers 

Detail Specification for Class IVa Dispersion-Unshifted 
Single-Mode Optical Fibers 

Detail Specification for Class IVa Dispersion-Unshifted 
Single-Mode Optical Fibers with Low Water Peak 
(ANSI/TIA/EIA-492CAAB-2000) 



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SPECIFICATION 
AND ISSUE DATE 

TIA-492DO00 
(rescinded) 

TIA^92DA00 
(rescinded) 

TIA-492E000, 1996 

TIA^92EA00, 1996 

TIA-559, 1989 

TIA/EIA-598-C, 2005 

IEEE 100 -00 

ANSI C2 - 07 

ICEA S-83-596-2001 
(ANSI/TIA-472C000-B) 

ANSI/ICEA S-84-608-02 



ICEAS-104-696-2001 
(ANS1/TIA-472E000) 



TITLE 

Sectional Specification for Class IVb Dispersion Shifted 
Single-Mode Optical Fiber (This document has been 
rescinded and is included for historical reference). 

Blank Detail Specification for Class IVb Dispersion Shifted 
Single-Mode Waveguide Optical Fiber (This document has 
been rescinded and is included for historical reference). 

Sectional Specification for Class IVd Nonzero-Dispersion 
Single-Mode Optical Fibers for the 1550 nm Window 

Blank Detail Specification for Class IVd Nonzero-dispersion 
Single-Mode Optical Fiber for the 1550 nm Window 

Single-Mode Fiber Optic System Transmission Design 

Optical Fiber Cable Color Coding 

The Authoritative Dictionary of IEEE Standards and Terms 

National Electrical Safety Code 

Fiber Optic Premises Distribution Cable 

Standard for Telecommunications Cable, Filled, Polyolefin 
Insulated, Copper Conductor, Technical Requirements 

Standard for Indoor-Outdoor Fiber Optic Cable 



ANSI/ICEA S-85-625-2002 Standard for Telecommunications Cable Aircore, Polyolefin 

Insulated, Copper Conductor Technical Requirements 



ICEA P-57-653-1995 



ICEA S-1 10-71 7-2003 
(ANSI/TIA-472F000) 

TL 9000* 



Guide for Implementation of Metric Units in ICEA 
Publications 

Standard for Optical Fiber Drop Cable 



Quality Management System Handbook. Published by 
Quality Excellence for Suppliers of Telecommunications 
Forum (QuEST Forum), 2001 



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ANSI/ICEA S-87-640-2006 



Annex A (Informative) 



Suggested Information for a Purchase Document 

If the user wishes to utilize this Standard for procurement purposes, it is suggested that 
the following minimum information be included in the purchase document: 

1 . The quantity of each item, in meters or feet. 

2. The name of each item (Optical Fiber Outside Plant Communications Cable). 

3. The identifying reference number for this Standard (ICEA S-87-640-2006) 

4. Construction details for each item. This may be defined by use of a 
manufacturer's part number, catalog reference, or by specifying the following: 

a. The intended application including details about the physical environment 
Annex C has additional considerations for specifying self-supporting 
cables for aerial applications. 

b. Any special product application requirements that could impact the 
installation or life of the item (installation methods, conduit details if used, 
etc.) 

c. Cable core construction 

i. gel filled or dry core 

ii. single fiber, tight buffer, or ribbon 

iii. stranded tube or central tube 

d. Cable sheath construction and requirements, including: 

i. non-armored or armored 

ii. any specific material requirements for 

1 . shielding, armoring, or other metallic coverings 

2. strength members 

3. jacket compound 



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e. Optical fiber requirements, including 

i. fiber type, class, and subclass (seeTable 2.1 and Table 2.2) 

ii. fiber core diameter (multimode only) 

iii. number of fibers 

iv. fiber grouping (i.e. loose fibers, fiber bundles, or ribbons) 

v. finished cable optical performance requirements (see Table 8-1 ) 

f. For composite cables only, the conductor requirements, including pair 
count, conductor size, insulation type, and transmission performance. 
(See ANSI/ICEA S-84-608 for guidance.) 

5. Special identification requirements different from this Standard, e.g. color 
codes or jacket print. 

6. Packaging specifics, including: 

a. Requirements for reels, packages or coils. 

b. Specifics/limitations on reel flange diameter, traverse width, drum 
diameter, arbor holes, gross weight, etc. 

c. Requirements for protective wrapping /lagging. 

d. Requirements for cable end preparation (caps, connectors, or splice 
closures), and cable end accessibility. 

7. Special quality requirements that apply including any special test, reporting or 
documentation. See 1.8. 

8. Any agency listing or acceptance required (e.g. ROUP, nee RUS and REA). 

9. Any other deviations from the requirements of this Standard that apply. 



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Annex B (Informative) 



Metallic Covering Materials 



Information is provided in this Annex for commonly used shields and armors as well as 
typical thickness and testing requirements. 



B.1. SHIELDING TAPE 

Note: aluminum tapes, either bare or polymer-coated, as described below, may be used 
in cable constructions. Because of the potential for reaction of aluminum with other 
cable components to produce a hydrogen product, particular care should be taken when 
using aluminum in cable designs. 

B.1.1 Bare Aluminum Tape 

The aluminum tape shall be Aluminum 1060, 1100, 1145, or 1235 and shall conform to 
the applicable requirements of ASTM B 736. The most commonly used thickness is as 
shown in Table B-1. 

Table B.1 - Thickness of aluminum alloy tapes 



Material 


Tape Thickness - mm (in) 


Nominal 


Minimum 


Alloy 1060, 1100, 
1145, or 1235 


0.20 (0.008) 


0.18(0.007) 



B.1.2 Coated Aluminum Tape 

The bare aluminum tape shall conform to the requirements of B.1.1. The coating(s) 
shall conform to ASTM B 736, Type I, Class 2. 



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B.1.3 Copper, Copper Alloy, and Bronze Tape 



Tapes shall be C1 10 copper, C194 copper alloy, or C220 bronze conforming to ASTM B 
694. Commonly used thicknesses are as shown in Table B.2. 

Table B.2 - Thickness of copper, copper alloy, and bronze tapes 



Material 


Tape Thickness - mm (in) 


Nominal 


Minimum 


C1 10 Copper 


0.13(0.005) 
0.25(0.010) 


0.11 (0.0045) 
0.23 (0.0092) 


C1 94 Copper Alloy 


0.15(0.006) 
0.18(0.007) 


0.14 (0.0055) 
0.17 (0.0065) 


C220 Bronze 


0.10 (0.004) 


0.08 (0.0032) 



B.2. ARMORING TAPES 

B.2.1 Copper and Steel Laminate Tape 

Prior to application to the cable, the laminated tape shall be in a fully annealed condition 
and shall conform to the applicable requirements of ASTM B 694. 

Commonly available types and thickness of metallurgically-bonded, copper-steel 
laminates are as shown in Table B,3. 

For adhesively-bonded copper-stainless steel laminates, each metallic component tape 
shall be in conformance with Table B.2 and subclause B.1.3 for copper, and with Table 
B.4 and subclause B.2.3 for stainless steel. 



Table B.3 - Thickness of copper-steel-copper laminate tapes 



(1) 



[Per ASTM B 694 (1) , with Two Layers of Copper] 


Cladding Ratio 

(%) 


Total Tape Thickness - mm (in) 


Nominal 


Minimum 


16/68/16 
33.3/33.3/33.3 


0.13(0.005) 
0.15 (0.006) 


0.11 (0.0045) 
0.14(0.0055) 


Note 1) For cladding ratios and thickness only 



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B.2.2 Bare Stainless Steel Tape 

The stainless steel tape shall be an AISI stainless steel alloy conforming to ASTM A 
167, alloy 302, 304, or 430 and the material characteristics of Table B.4. When used 
singly, the nominal tape thickness shall be 0.13 mm (0.005 in). When used as part of 
an adhesively or metallurgical^ bonded structure, the nominal stainless steel thickness 
shall be 0.08 mm (0.003 in) for the 302 and 304 alloys, and 0.10 mm (0.004 in) for the 
430 alloy. 

Table B.4 - Stainless steel tape composition 



Element 


Percent 


(by Weight) by Alloy 1 » 


Type 302 


Type 304 


Type 430 




(ASTM A 167) 


(ASTM A 167) 


(ASTM A 176) 


Carbon 


0.15 


0.08 


0.12 


Manganese 


2.00 


2.00 


1.00 


Phosphorus 


0.045 


0.045 


0.040 


Sulphur 


0.030 


0.030 


0.030 


Silicon 2) 


1.00 


1.00 


1.00 


Chromium 2 } 


17.00-19.00 


18.00-20.00 


14.00-18.00 


Nickel 


8.00-10.00 


8.00-10.50 


0.75 


Nitrogen 


0.10 


0.10 


— 


Notes: 








1 ) All figures maximum unless 


range indicated. 






2) With some minor exception: 


> to ASTM limits. 







B.2.3 Coated Stainless Steel Tape 

Bare stainless steel tape meeting the requirements of B.2.2 shall be coated on one or two 
sides with a protective resin material which shall meet the requirements of ASTM B 736, 
Type I, Class 2 coating. 

As indicated in Table B.5, the steel shall have a minimum tensile yield strength of 207 MPa 
(30 kpsi) at 0.2% offset and a minimum ultimate tensile strength and elongation as shown 
in Table B-5, below, for a 50 mm (2.0 in) specimen length when tested in accordance with 
ASTM A 370. 



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Table B.5 - Stainless steel tape physical performance 



Alloy 
Number 


Nominal 

Thickness 

mm (in) 


Minimum Ultimate 

Tensile Strength 

MPa (kpsi) 


Elongation in 
50 mm (2 in) 
Minimum (%) 


302 
302 


0.13 (0.005) 
0.08 (0.003) 


517 (75) 
517 (75) 


40 
40 


304 
304 


0.13 (0.005) 
0.08 (0.003) 


517 (75) 
517 (75) 


40 
40 


430 
430 


0.13 (0.005) 
0.10 (0.004) 


448 (65) 
448 (65) 


20 
20 



Table B.6 - Thickness of stainless steel tapes 



Material 


Tape Thickness - mm (in) 


Nominal 


Minimum 


Stainless Steel, 
300-series 


0.13 (0.005) 
0.08 (0.003) 


0.11 (0.0045) 
0.07 (0.0027) 


Stainless Steel, 
430 Alloy 


0.13(0.005) 
0.10(0.004) 


0.11 (0.0045) 
0.09 (0.0036) 



B.2.4 Bare Low Carbon Steel Tape 

The tape shall be one of the following materials: 

Table B.7 - Thickness of steel tapes 



Material 


Specification 
Number 


Tape Thickness - mm (in) 


Nominal 


Minimum 


Carbon Steel 


— 


0.15(0.006) 


0.14 (0.0055) 


Black plate steel 


ASTM A 625 


0.15(0.006) 


0.14 (0.0055) 


Terne coated steel 


ASTM A 308 


0.15(0.006) 


0.14 (0.0055) 


Tin-plated steel 


ASTM A 624 


0.15(0.006) 


0.14 (0.0055) 


Electrolytic chrome coated steel, 
(ECCS) 


ASTM A 657 


0.15(0.006) 


0.14(0.0055) 


Tin-plated electrolytic chrome 
coated steel, (ECCS) 


ASTM A 624 & 
ASTM A 657 


0.15 (0.006) 


0.14 (0.0055) 



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ANSI/ICEA S-87-640-2006 

The low-carbon substrate steel shall have a maximum tensile strength of 414 MPa 
(60kpsi) and a minimum elongation of 15% for a 50 mm (2.0 in) specimen length when 
tested in accordance with ASTM A 370. The low-carbon substrate steel composition shall 
meet the requirements of ASTM A 623, Type MR. 

The low-carbon steel material characteristics shall be per Table B.8. 

Table B.8 - Steel tape composition 



Element 


Maximum Percent 
(by weight) 


Carbon 

Manganese 

Phosphorus 

Sulfur 


0.13 
0.60 
0.02 
0.05 



B.2.5 Coated Low Carbon Steel Tape 

The steel tape shall be coated on one or two sides with a protective resin material which 
shall meet the bonding-to-metal, heat sealability, lap-shear, and moisture resistance 
requirements of ASTM B 736, Type I, Class 2. Coating thickness shall be in 
accordance with ASTM B 736. 



B.3 SHIELDING AND ARMORING TAPES 

B.3.1 Single-Tape Constructions 

Adhesively or metallurgically bonded copper-stainless steel tapes can be utilized on a 
single-tape structure to obtain both the shielding and armoring requirements. The copper 
component of this structure shall meet the requirement of B.1.3 for Copper 110 alloy. The 
stainless steel component of this structure shall meet the requirement of B.2.2 for Stainless 
Steel 302, 304, or 430 alloys. Commonly used types and thickness of adhesively or 
metallurgically bonded copper-stainless steel composite structures are shown in Table B.3. 

B.3.2 Dual-Tape Constructions 

When both shielding and armoring are required, a dual-tape construction may be used 
where a shielding tape meeting the requirements of B.1 is formed around the cable. 
Formed over the top of this shielding tape is an armoring tape meeting the requirements of 
B.2. 



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Annex C (Normative) 



Requirements for Very-Low Temperature Applications 



C.1 SCOPE 

The requirements of this annex apply to cables that are intended for use in climates 
where a very low operating temperature is required. For the purpose of this Standard, 
this temperature is stated to be -50 °C, as compared to the low temperature of -40 °C 
that is applicable for all other outside plant applications as defined elsewhere in this 
Standard (See 1.1 and 7.24). The temperature of -50 °C is considered adequate for 
outside plant applications in the coldest regions of North America. Temperature 
requirements other than those stated above shall be established by agreement between 
manufacturer and user. 



C.2 CHANGES TO NORMATIVE REQUIREMENTS 

To support a very-low temperature rating, the following modifications shall be made to 
the requirements of this Standard, as indicated below. 

C.2.1 Changes to 1.1 SCOPE 

• The low temperature value for both Operating and Storage shall be -50 °C 
(-58 °F). 

• The low temperature value for Installation is unchanged (-30 °C [-22 °F]). 

C.2.2 Changes to PART 2 OPTICAL FIBERS 

The temperature range for optical fiber requirements remains the same. 

C.2. 3 Changes to 6.2 CABLE MARKING & 6.4 PACKAGE MARKING 

No special marking is required. The manufacturer may elect to incorporate special 
marking to identify the cable as having a very-low temperature rating. Such marking, if 
used, shall conform to all relevant requirements of Part 6 (e.g., spacing, size, print 
methods, etc.). 



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C.2.4 Changes to 7.21 LOW TEMPERATURE BEND TEST 

No modifications are required to the low temperature bend test, per 7.21. The low 
temperature bend test is applicable to cable installation performance only, which is not 
different for very low temperature applications. 

C.2.5 Changes to 7.22 CABLE EXTERNAL FREEZING TEST 

No modifications are required to the cable external freezing test, per 7.22. The cable 
external freezing test is defined by FOTP-98 as the temperature at which ice exhibits its 
maximum expansion, which is independent of the low temperature capability of the 
cable product. 

C.2.6 Changes to 7.24 CABLE TEMPERATURE CYCLING TEST 

C.2.6.1 Test Procedure 

The following modifications are required to the cable temperature cycling test, per 7.24. 
The cable shall be tested at the environmental extremes of -50 °C and +70 °C. Two 
methods may be used to assess the -50 °C performance of optical fiber cable. Note 
that the acceptance criteria for the very low temperature performance requirements 
differ from those specified for -40 °C performance. 

C.2.6. 1.1 Method 1 

The -50 °C test temperature is incorporated as an additional step performed after the 
usual -40 °C test temperature, in each of the two test cycles. All other provisions of 
FOTP-3 apply. 

This test method will increase the time needed to perform a complete temperature 
cycling test. It is useful in cases where the manufacturer desires to verify the -40 °C 
performance of the cable independent from the very-low temperature performance at 
-50 °C. 

C.2.6.1. 2 Method 2 

The -40 °C test temperature requirement may be eliminated entirely in favor of the 
-50 °C test temperature. In the case where the cable being tested is also specified to 
meet the standard -40 °C performance requirements as well, the acceptance criteria of 
7.24.2 shall be used. Otherwise the acceptance criteria of C.2.6.2 apply. 



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C.2.6.2 



Acceptance Criteria 



Any increase in attenuation shall be: 

• < 0.20 dB at 1550 nm for single-mode fibers 

• < 0.50 dB at 1 300 nm for multimode fibers 

Notes 

1) In all cases, cables conforming to the Very-Low Temperature rating shall be 
capable of passing the normal -40 °C requirements of 7.24.2. 

2) If the »50 °C test temperature is being used for -40 °C compliance using 
Method 2, above, the acceptance criteria of 7.24.2 shall be used. 



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Annex D (Normative) 



Self-supporting Figure-8 Cables Designs 
D.1 GENERAL 

When planning for the aerial installation of self-supporting fiber optic cables, there are 
several important factors to consider with respect to the design, specification, 
installation and performance of the optical plant. In addition to being subject to the 
same harsh environmental conditions as other optical fiber cables placed outdoors they 
must also ensure a particular limiting condition, or conditions, are not exceeded due to 
the added tensile stresses and mounting hardware used. The primary limiting 
conditions for a typical aerial installation are the allowable cable sag, the tensile rating of 
the cable or messenger (if used), or attachment hardware, and the allowable fiber strain 
or attenuation at maximum environmental loading. As a result, additional performance 
criteria must be specified for such applications. 



D.2 INTEGRAL MESSENGER REQUIREMENTS 

When specified, an integral messenger may be included as part of the cable covering or 
sheath ("Figure-8" construction) when the cable is intended for aerial self-supporting 

applications. 

D.2.1 Unless otherwise specified, the support messenger shall be 6.4 mm (1/4 inch) 
seven-wire, extra high strength, Class A galvanized steel conforming to the 
requirements of ASTM A 640. 

D.2.2 The zinc coating shall thoroughly cover the steel strands to protect them from 
corrosion and prevent slippage of the messenger in the jacket. The zinc coating 
shall thoroughly cover each of the individual steel strands. 

D.2.3 The flooding compound shall be compatible with the jacket when tested in 
accordance with ASTM D 4568 at a temperature of 80DC, and shall have adhesive 
properties such that the jacket to messenger bond will meet the Cable Sheath 
Adherence Test (Unbonded) of 7.26. 

D.2.4 The messenger and cable core shall be parallel and shall be formed with an integral 
jacket as covered in 5.4 through 5.6. 



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D.3 JACKET THICKNESS REQUIREMENTS 

For jackets applied over an integral messenger, the jacket thickness over the messenger 
and over the cable core shall be as given in Table D.1. The web dimensions between the 
messenger and the cable core shall be in accordance with Table D.2. 

Table D.1 - Outer jacket thickness requirements for figure-8 messenger cables 



Calculated Average 
Diameter (D) Under 
Jacket 


Acceptable Thickness - mm (in.) 


Minimum Average 


Minimum 


Jacket Over The Core (1) 


1.02(0.040) 


0.86 ( 0.034 ) 


Jacket Over The Messenger 


1.37(0.054) 


1.14(0.045) 


Note 1) Jackets are also subject to a maximum eccentricity requirement of 50% for 
bonded sheaths and 40% for all other sheaths, with eccentricity calculated as required by 
ASTM D 4565. 



Table D.2 - Dimension requirements for messenger webs 



Web Dimensions and Tolerances - mm (inch) 


Thickness of Web 


Height of Web 


1.52+0.51/-0.25 
(0.060 + 0.020/-0.010) 


2.29 ± 0.76 
(0.090 ± 0.030) 



D.4 CABLE TEST REQUIREMENTS 

D.4.1 Static Tensile Testing of Aerial Self-Supporting Cables 

The Static Tensile Test determines the ability of aerial self-supporting cable to withstand 
the prevailing environmental conditions in the geographic area of the installation. The 
National Electrical Safety Code® (NESC) contains general information of the 

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environmental conditions that affect cable loading. The three predominant categories 
for the United States are designated as heavy, medium, and light. Refer to Paragraph 
C.2.5 of the NESC on Environmental loading. 

A dynamic tensile test is not applicable for the cable types addressed by this standard. 

D.4.1.1 Test Procedure 

When agreed to by the manufacturer and user, a static tensile test shall be conducted in 
accordance with FOTP-33, with exceptions as noted in D.4.1.2. The fiber strain test must 
be performed as part of the static tensile test. Fiber strain measurements and data 
reporting shall be made as required by FOTP-38. 

D.4.1 .2 Test Conditions 

1 . Test Condition I is prior to the application of the load. 

2. Test Condition II is with the cable under the tensile loading: 

3. Test Condition III is with the load removed. 

The Maximum Rated Cable Load (MRCL) and the maximum added axial fiber strain are 
to be provided by the cable manufacturer for the specific cable type being tested. The 
MRCL and the maximum added fiber strain shall not be exceeded throughout the test. 

D.4.1 .3 Exceptions to FOTP-33 



1. 



3. 



The use of sheaves is not required. If used, sheaves shall meet the 

requirements of 7.24. 1 . 

Prior to the start of the test, test sample ends shall be secured to prevent 

the ends of the optical fiber from moving relative to the cable ends. 

A minimum of 25 m (82 ft) of the test sample shall be subjected to the 

applied tensile load. 



D.4.1. 4 Test Steps 



1. Measure the optical power transmission at Test Condition I. 

2. Tension the cable to the MRCL (Test Condition II). Apply the load in 
increments recommended by the cable manufacturer. Record the following: 

a. Cable load and strain 

b. Optical power transmission 

c. Added axial fiber strain. 

3. Remove the load (Test Condition III) and allow the cable to relax for 
5 minutes. Record the optical power transmission 



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ANSI/ICEA S-87-640-2006 

D.4.1.5 Acceptance Criteria 

The axial fiber strain at MRCL shall be < 60 % of the fiber proof level. 

The increase in attenuation at MRCL, and after load removal, shall be < 0.40 dB at 
1550 nm for single-mode fibers, and < 0.60 dB at 1300 nm for multimode fibers. 

D.4.2 Cable galloping test 

The purpose of this test is to assess the effects of fatigue and strain on the self- 
supporting cable and on the optical characteristics of the fibers when exposed to typical 
galloping forces, such as might be experienced once installed. 

D.4.2.1 Test setup 

No current ANSI approved FOTPs exist for cable galloping testing. A basic test 
arrangement for conducting cable galloping testing is shown in Figure D.1. The test 
sample is secured on each end using suitable assemblies or other fixtures to support 
the application of the test tensile load in the axial direction to simulate a self-supporting 
installation. Other assemblies are used to fix the cable in the vertical and horizontal 
planes, at points near the ends, to isolate the cable length subjected to galloping (fixed 
length). The points on each end of the test sample where the galloping length is fixed 
and the tensile load is applied may be combined or separate. In any case, the length 
exposed to galloping must fall within a section of the test sample that is tensioned as 
required below, and must not affect the application of the tensile load. 

The length of the fiber optic cable test sample shall allow removal of the cable coverings 
outside of the tensioning points to support access to the optical fibers for optical testing. 
The test sample shall be terminated at both ends prior to tensioning in a manner such 
that the optical fibers cannot move axially relative to the cable structure in the length 
under load. 

A calibrated device, such as a dynamometer, load cell, or load beam, shall be used to 
monitor cable tension. The cable should be tensioned and held to a minimum of 50% of 
the rated maximum installation tension to a maximum of 4900 N (500 kg-f) throughout 
the test. Installation tensions down to 2450 N (250 kg-f) are allowed if required to 
induce galloping in the cable test sample. 

The fixed length (Li) shall be at least 35 meters with the suspension assembly placed at 
approximately one-half of the distance between the two dead-end assemblies, such that 
L 2 and L 3 are equal. The suspension assembly shall be at a height such that the static 
sag angle of the cable to horizontal does not exceed 1 degree in the direction of the 
active span (L 2 ). 

An electronically-controlled shaker shall be used to excite the cable in the vertical plane. 
The shaker assembly shall be securely fastened to the cable so that it is normal to the 
cable in the vertical plane, and shall not affect the application of the tensile load along 

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the length under test. The amplitude of a mid-loop (antinode), single loop galloping, 
shall be monitored. The maximum vibration peak-to-peak amplitude shall be one 
twenty-fifth of the active span length. The test frequency shall be the single loop 
resonant frequency. 

The total length of optical fiber under test as a function of the fixed length (Li) shall be a 
minimum of 100 m. To achieve this length a number of fibers may be spliced together 
such that the number of concatenated fibers multiplied by the fixed length under test 
(Li) is at least 100 m. Splices should be made so the optical equipment can be located 
at the same end, but other arrangements are allowed. At least one fiber from each 
buffer tube, fiber bundle, or unit shall be measured for the test. 

D. 4.2.2 Test procedures 

The cable shall be subjected to a minimum of 100,000 galloping cycles. The test is the 
single loop resonant frequency for the galloping condition. The minimum peak-to-peak 
antinode amplitude/loop length ratio shall be maintained at a ratio of 1/25, as measured in 
the active span (L 2 ). 

The optical test source output shall be split into two signals. One signal shall be 
connected to an optical power meter and shall act as a reference. The other signal 
shall be connected to a free end of the test fiber. The returning signal shall be 
connected to a second optical power meter. All optical connections and splices shall 
remain intact through the entire test duration. 

Optical measurements shall be taken as follows: 

1. The test sample shall be pre-tensioned to 5-10% of maximum rated installation 
tension and an initial optical measurement taken of each signal. 

Note - The difference between the two signals for the initial measurement 
provides a reference level. The change in this difference during the test 
will indicate the change in attenuation of the test fiber. The signals may 
be output on a strip chart recorder for a continuous hardcopy record. 

2. The test sample shall then be loaded per D.4.2.1 . Once the vibrations have been 
initiated, the attention shall be recorded every 2000 vibrations and the sample 
physically inspected. 

3. A final optical measurement shall be taken after the completion of the 100 
thousand vibration test cycles, allowing for at least two hours stabilization time. 

4. Following the test, load a section of the cable which includes the fixed length (U) 
to the cable MRCL per D4.1 and measure the attenuation. 

D.4.2.3 Acceptance Criteria 

There shall be no visible cracks or other openings on the outer surface of the jacket. 

Any increase in attenuation shall be: 

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• < 1.0 dB/km at 1550 nm for single-mode fibers 

• < 1 .0 dB/km at 1 300 nm for multimode fibers 

D A3 Aeolian vibration test 

Cable installations most susceptible to the effects of aeolian vibrations are aerial self- 
supporting cables with a round cross section, due the flow of air around the cable. 
Aeolian testing is not required, as it is not considered a major risk factor for figure-8 
aerial self-supporting cables. 



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Annex E (Normative) 



1625 nm Cabled Fiber Performance Requirements 

E.1 SCOPE 

The requirements of this annex apply to cables that are intended for use in systems 
operating in the L-Band (1565 to 1625 nm). The requirements of this annex apply only 
when specifically required (invoked) by the customer detailed specification. 

Requirements for L-band performance, other than those stated in this Annex, shall be 
established by agreement between manufacturer and user. 

E.2 CHANGES TO NORMATIVE REQUIREMENTS 

To support operation in the L-band, the following modifications shall be made to the 
acceptance criteria for the various mechanical and environmental tests of this Standard, 
as indicated below. The requirements for the traditional attenuation wavelengths of 
1310 and 1550 nm for single-mode fiber are not affected by this annex and are as 
included in the body of the ICEA-640 Standard. 

Table E.1 - Acceptance criteria for L-Band operation 



TEST 


Test Section 
Reference 


Acceptance 
Criteria 1(2) 


Attenuation - Cabled Fiber Coefficient 


8.2 


0.4 dB/km 


Attenuation - Point Discontinuities 


8.4 


0.2 dB 


Low And High Temperature Bend Test 


7.21 


0.3 dB 


Cable External Freezing Test 


7.22 


0.3 dB 


Cable Temperature Cycling Test 

Cables for Very Low Temperature 
Applications 


7.24 
Annex D 


0.3 dB/km 
0.4 dB/km 


Cyclic Flexing Test 


7.27 


0.3 dB 


Impact Test 


7.29 


0.3 dB 


Optical Fiber Cable Tensile Loading And 
Fiber Strain Test 


7.30 


0.3 dB 


Compressive Loading Test 


7.31 


0.3 dB 


Cable Twist Test 


7.32 


0.3 dB 


Notes: 

1. Results at 1625 may be used to demonstrate compliance at 1550 nm, using 1550 
acceptance criteria. 

2. Results at 1550 shall not be used to demonstrate compliance at 1625 nm. 



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Annex F (Informative) 



ICEA Telecommunications Cable Standards 



These standards were developed by the Insulated Cable Engineers Association, Inc. 
(ICEA). 



NUMBER 
ICEA P-47-434-1965 

ANSI/ICEA S-56-434-1983 
ANSI/ICEA S-77-528-1983 

ANSI/ICEA S-80-576-2002 

ICEA S-83-596-2001 
(adopted as ANSI/TIA- 
472C000-B) 
ANSI/ICEA S-84-608-2002 

ANSI/ICEA S-85-625-2002 
ANSI/ICEA S-88-626-1993 
ANSI/ICEA S-86-634-2004 

ANSI/ICEA S-87-640-2006 
ANSI/ICEA S-89-648-2000 
ANSI/ICEA S-90-661-2002 

ANSI/ICEA S-91 -674-2006 
ANSI/ICEA S-92-675-2005 



DESCRIPTION 
Pressurization Characteristics, PE Communication Cable 

Polyolefin Insulated Communications Cables For Outdoor 
Use, Reaffirmed October 18,1991 

Outside Plant Communications Cables, Specifying Metric 
Wire Sizes (Rev. 1990), Reaffirmed April 27,1990 

Communications Wire & Cable For Premises Wiring 

Fiber Optic Premises Distribution Cable 

Telecommunications Cable, Filled Polyolefin Insulated 
Copper Conductor 

Aircore, Polyolefin Insulated, Copper Conductor 
Telecommunications Cable 
Telephone Cordage and Cord Sets 

Buried Distribution & Service Wire, Filled Polyolefin 
Insulated, Copper Conductor 

Optical Fiber Outside Plant Communications Cable 

Telecommunications Aerial Service Wire 

Category 3, 5, & 5e Individually Unshielded Twisted Pair 
Indoor Cables (With or Without an Overall Shield) for Use in 
General Purpose and LAN Communication Wiring Systems 

Coaxial & Coaxial/Twisted Pair Composite Buried Service 
Wires 

Coaxial & Coaxial/Twisted Pair Composite Aerial Service 
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ANSI/ICEA S-87-640-2006 



Wires 



ANSI/ICEA S-1 00-685-1 997 



Thermoplastic Insulated and Jacketed Telecommunications 
Station Wire for Indoor/Outdoor Use 



ANSI/ICEA S-98-688-1997 



ANSI/ICEA S-99-689-1997 



ICEA S-1 04-696-2001 

(adopted as ANSt/TIA- 

472EO0O) 

ANSI/ICEA S-101-699-2001 



ICEA S-1 06-703-2006 



ICEA S-1 07-704-2001 



ICEA S-1 10-717-2003 
(adopted as ANSI/TIA- 
472F000) 



Broadband Twisted Pair, Telecommunications Cable 
Aircore, Polyolefin Insulated Copper Conductors 

Broadband Twisted Pair Telecommunications Cable Filled, 
Polyolefin Insulated Copper Conductors 

Indoor-Outdoor Optical Fiber Cable 



Category 3, Individually Unshielded Twisted Pair Indoor 
Cable for Use in General Purpose Non-LAN 
Telecommunications Wiring Systems, Technical 
Requirements 

Standard for Broadband Aerial Service Wire - Aircore, 
Polyolefin, Copper Conductors -Technical Requirements 

Broadband Buried Service Wire, Aircore, Polyolefin 
Insulated, Copper Conductor, Technical Requirements 

Standard for Optical Fiber Drop Cable 



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